The Best Fishing Spots in the Keys and How to Fish Them
Apr 8, 2019 | 9 minute read Comments
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Reading Time: 9 minutes

The Florida Keys are the perfect fishing vacation spot. Thousands of avid anglers who come here each year can confirm it. Many of them trailer their boats all the way from North Carolina or Rhode Island. Is it worth it? It sure is! The sky’s the limit when it comes to fishing here. It takes about 20 minutes to get from the skinny waters of inshore flats to deep offshore canyons. So, today, you’re going to get a look at some of the best fishing spots in the Keys. Next time you visit, you’ll know exactly where to head.

Day 1: Flats Fishing Around Key West

There are many reasons that make Key West one of the most popular spots in the Straits of Florida. The city has a rich cultural heritage and buzzing nightlife. You can fly in or drive all the way from Key Largo. Key West is popular among families with kids. You can explore the waters, go on eco tours, go on treasure hunts, and explore landmark buildings.

But it’s not only the Hemingway House, water activities, and good food that make the town so popular. There’s one thing that beats all this. Fishing.

Aerial view of Key West.

Key West is surrounded by a vast surface of flats that hold Bonefish, Permit, and Tarpon. You can start your vacation by scouting the flats and doing a bit of sight fishing, then switch to the fly. Fly anglers from abroad come here year after year for world-class fishing. To get to the secret spots with big fish, pair up with a local guide.

But that’s not all. Key West lies just 80 miles north of Cuba. Many anglers decide to hire a deep sea charter to take them fishing in the Cuban waters. Multi-day trip, anyone?

These skinny waters fish for Snook, Tarpon, Permit, Lemon Shark, and Yellowtail Snapper. You won’t find choppy seas here, only calm waters teeming with fish.

If you want to try something that’s essentially Key West, then book a fishing trip on a small flats boat. Snook, Permit, and Tarpon swarm these spots, so you want to be as quiet as possible.

Your fishing guide will stand on a casting platform and use a long pole to steer the boat. As the fish are spooky, you don’t want to make too much noise. Your guide will spot the fish from the platform. He will tell you when to make the cast as you stand on the bow, reeling in one fish after the other.

Day 2: Bottom Fishing Around the Marquesas Keys Rock Piles

There’s one more thing you must try before heading east to explore other riches of the Florida Keys. Just 20 miles west of Key West lies a group of uninhabited mangrove islands that form the Marquesas Keys. These islands don’t have a lot to offer to city lovers but are sheer epicness when it comes to sport fishing.

The water depth around the rock piles on the east side of the islands is between 15 and 30 feet. These patches of rocky bottoms are home to an amazing number of Snapper and Grouper.

A map showing Marquesas bottom fishing spots.

You will be pulling up fish every two minutes and they will almost always be keepers. Head a couple of miles northwest of the island. You will find rocks scattered across the otherwise sandy bottom. This is where the big fish are.

Mutton and Pink Snapper, Red and Gag Grouper are the most frequent catches. But you will often hook into King Mackerel, Yellowtail Snapper, Barracuda, and Sharks.

An angler holding a big Grouper which he caught while bottom fishing around the Marquesas Key.

If your friends think fishing is boring, bottom fishing around the Marquesas Keys is the perfect remedy for them. There is no waiting here. The rods will be bending, as hungry fish bust up your bait. Use small minnows, pinfish, sardines, squid, and mullet for the best results.

A trip to the Marquesas is another truly local thing to do. If you’re traveling with kids, this fishing trip is a great starting point for them. The fish are there in the water ready to take your bait. You won’t have to chum the bait to heat things up  – the fishing is on fire.

Day 3: Backcountry Fishing Around Sugarloaf Key Islands

It’s time for a bit more intimate fishing! After having feasted on flaky Snapper meat in the Marquesas, head east to Sugarloaf Keys. Here you will find a maze of mangrove cuts, flats, and creeks rich in fish. It’s scenic, it’s quiet, and there’s plenty of fish.

You can explore these waters from a skiff, or if you aren’t afraid of working out, you can hop into a kayak or canoe. If it’s windy offshore, you can always catch fish around these sheltered channels.

Most of these mangrove cuts are only a couple of feet deep. Every now and then you will come across some deeper holes that plunge down to depths of 20 feet. Before you head into these meandering mangrove cuts, fish for pilchards on the flats.

A lady angler holding a big Permit she caught while fishing backcountry waters of Sugarloaf Key.

Here you will find clear waters so you can sight fish for Snook, Tarpon, and Permit. You can also run into Jack Crevalle, Bonnethead Sharks, and some Snapper. Stock up on squid and pinfish, and you should have no trouble getting the bite.

Day 4: Fishing the Channels of Cudjoe Key

Each island in the Florida Keys has good fishing opportunities. Some places attract most of the anglers who look for tried and proven honey holes. But you should make it your goal to try out spots that don’t always make it to the headlines. The channels of Cudjoe Key are one of the best fishing spots in the Keys. You won’t regret coming here.

Non-local anglers often overlook this network of flats, mangrove islands, and channels. But you shouldn’t. If you do, you could be missing out on a chance to reel in Snapper, Grouper, Bonefish, Permit, Tarpon, and Jacks.

These channels are often shallow and great for sight fishing. You might come across deep, wide cuts where sunken boats and other debris make it for a hot fishing spot.

Plus, these mangrove islands and rich vegetation protect the channels from the wind. This means you’ll be able to get out even when other spots are not accessible.

An angler holding a Barracuda he caught while fishing the channels of Cudjoe Key.

You can do drift fishing near the shoreline or sight fishing around the flats. Calm waters make Cudjoe Key channels popular among kayak anglers. Rent a ‘yak and explore the murky deep waters.

As for the bait, you will find a lot of mullet, crab, and shrimp around these fisheries. They are a food of choice for all the game fish around you. If you like action, these channels will give you a chase to remember. Sharks and Barracuda often forage these waters. Get ready!

Day 5: Fishing for Tarpon Under the Bahia Honda Bridge

If you want to try something Floridian, then you must fish for Tarpon around the Bahia Honda Bridge. The “Silver King” is nowhere as numerous as here.

The channel between the Old Bahia Honda bridge and the Overseas Highway is the deepest inshore fishery in the Keys. The waters drop from 18 to 25 feet and offer some of the best bridge fishing in the Florida Keys.

There is a lot of food moving between the bridge pylons and the pilings serve as a good shelter for the game fish. As you warm up to get to the Tarpon business, you can hook into Permit, Sheepshead, Mutton Snapper, and Hammerhead Sharks.

An angler fishing for Tarpon near the Bahia Honda Bridge.

Tarpon swarm these waterways as part of their migration northwards. They weigh between 70 and 130 lbs on average, though anglers have pulled in fish bigger than that. For your best chances at success, use crabs as bait – it works like a charm.

What’s great about this world-famous fishery is that Tarpon are in the water throughout the day. No reason to get up early – spend your morning snorkeling or enjoy the rich wildlife of Big Pine Key’s Blue Hole.

Day 6: Best Deep Sea Fishing at Marathon Humps

Fishing the Hump out of Marathon (also known as the West Hump) is for the experienced angler only. This fishery is the closest thing to an actual angling paradise. Deep sea fishing is made for these waters, which often plummet to over 500 ft.

Marathon hump fishing

The Marathon Hump is a seamount, a mountain that rises from the ocean floor. It offers good shelter and traps a lot of baitfish. The strong currents of the Gulf Stream push the baitfish towards the surface. There they make an accessible prey for the big game fish.

You’ll have a chance to fish for monster pelagics and prove you are stronger than massive bottom fish. These fishing spots are home to Blue and White Marlin, Sailfish, Yellowfin and Blackfin Tuna, Wahoo, and Mahi. The battle with Marlin and Tuna can oftentimes last for hours. If you want a true test of your stamina and strength, sit tight in that fighting chair!

Two anglers holding a Sailfish they caught while deep sea fishing out of Marathon Key

If you want to go home with a big, tasty dinner, prepare to pull hard. Snowy, Strawberry, and Yellowedge Grouper, Tilefish, and Queen Snapper frequent these waters. You will need to pull them up from depths of 450+ feet. So you might need to use the electric reel unless you want to lose your dinner.

Day 7: Land an Inshore Super Grand Slam in Islamorada

After your brawl with Marlin, Tuna, and Grouper, it’s time for something different.

Islamorada has the nickname “Sport Fishing Capital of the World”, and you shouldn’t miss it. There is so much you can do here! Fish offshore reefs and wrecks, chase Bonefish and Snook on the flats, and go fly fishing for Tarpon.

But, since you’re in a special place, why not do something special? Try to put your name among the few who have managed to catch Bonefish, Permit, Tarpon, and Snook in a single day.

And given the premier Islamorada fisheries, it shouldn’t be hard to do it. These waters are some of the richest fisheries in the whole of Florida.

Islamorada inshore super grand slam: Four anglers, each holding a permit, snook, tarpon, and bonefish they caught while fishing in Islamorada.

Each of the fish have their own unique features, so it’s a real feat to land them all in a single day. It’s a fishing quest second to none! Plus, you don’t have to travel far offshore. No choppy seas here! You will be playing hide and seek with the fish around the mangrove islands and flats of Islamorada. And it’s also suitable for less experienced anglers. Your whole family can come along and do something exciting together.

Day 8: Catch Snapper and Grouper on Tavernier Key Reefs

A reef patch south of Tavernier Key holds a good number of Mutton, Mangrove, and Yellowtail Snapper, as well as Gag Grouper. These fishing trips are perfect if you want some laid-back family time. You can head out in the morning, bend the rods, catch fish for lunch, come back home for some pool time and a nap, then head out again for another round of fishing.

In case it’s windy and wavy, you might not be able to find baitfish. Use frozen bait, such as glass minnow. It will attract some smaller Snapper. If you can catch live bait, go with Ballyhoo. They work well here and can get you Yellowtail Snapper and Gag Grouper.

A dad and his son holding a Snapper they caught while fishing reefs out of Tavernier Key.

These fishing trips are relaxing and work well with beginner anglers. But, make sure to look out for some wayward Barracuda. They will often get close to the boat and wait for you to hook into something, then run for it and snatch it. Still, it’s fun action, especially for your young ones.

Day 9: Fishing the Shipwrecks of Key Largo

You might know Key Largo as the best place in the world for diving. But that’s only one part of its appeal. Complete your Florida Keys fishing vacation with a bang. Come fish the shipwrecks where thousands of fish roam!

Duane and Bibb are sunken ships that lie a couple of miles from Key Largo. The fisheries near Duane are 120 feet deep. These sandy bottoms are home to Amberjack, Grouper, and Snapper, to name just a few.

Bibb is one of the premier diving sites, with excellent fishing opportunities. It lies just six nautical miles from Key Largo. Hogfish, Black Grouper, and Snapper swim around the sunken vessel. Make sure you tie your boat to the mooring buoy, as fishing is not allowed otherwise.

Satelite image of waters out of Key Largo and approximate location of Bibb and Duane shipwrecks.

Some of the shipwrecks are also used for dive boats. If you wouldn’t like divers to show up in the middle of your fishing spot, it’s best to go out on a local charter. The captains will know which spots are less crowded but still productive.

Which of these fishing spots have you tried before? What was the fishing like? What other spots in the Keys are a must-fish? We’d love to hear your suggestions in the comments below.

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Comments (39)
  • Philip Rogerts

    Oct 1, 2018

    Great Stefan, really I have learned so many important things about fishing. So interesting & informative post you did here. Thanks.

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      George

      Oct 4, 2018

      Thanks for the kind words, Philip! Glad you enjoy our writing.

      George

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  • Mike Markoff

    Oct 14, 2018

    Thanks for the great info. Going to be staying on a houseboat in the black water sound/ surprise lake area. The boat is moored out in the water- any tips for casting from the house boat ?

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      Sean

      Nov 7, 2018

      Hey Mike,

      Thanks for reading the blog, I’m glad you like it.

      Casting from your houseboat would provide you with some excellent fishing opportunities.
      Lake Surprise and Blackwater Lake are home to Spotted Seatrout and Snapper. I would recommend casting around 6 AM or 6 PM. As far as the equipment goes, a 7 ft rod, the old egg beater spinning reel and live shrimp will do the trick. There are a lot of bait shops in the area, so you won’t have trouble finding them.

      We’re here should you need anything else.

      Tight lines!

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  • islamoradafishingflorida

    Dec 27, 2018

    Amazing Blog.
    I really love to read more about your fishing services.
    Key Largo Backcountry Fishing

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  • Al Sereika

    Feb 3, 2019

    I’m on one of these Marathon Key channels in between the houses. What can I catch right of the of the house and what should I use?

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      Sean

      Feb 4, 2019

      Hey Al,

      Thanks for reading the blog.

      I’m not exactly sure what you mean by “right of the of the house”, but I can tell you that you will have no shortage of species to fish for from the docks!

      Depending on when you want to fish, you’ll have a good chance of catching smaller Snapper, Sharks (they are bound to turn up if you chum the waters), Grouper and Tarpon if you’re lucky. The lower bridges will give you the best of chances to catch most of these, but only heavier tackle will allow you to catch a Tarpon or a Shark. If you’re planning on fishing in February, you’ll have a great chance of catching Grouper.

      For baiting, a cast net for minnows will go a long way, but live shrimp will get the job done too.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Joe

    Mar 2, 2019

    Where’s best in April would like to do deep sea for sail fish and a day in the flats

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      Sean

      Mar 8, 2019

      Hello Joe,

      Thank you for reading the blog.

      Deep sea fishing for Sailfish is great around the Marathon Hump.

      As far as flats fishing is concerned, Key West is your best bet. Bonefish will be on the bite at this time. You could also venture onto the reefs for some Permit.

      We’re here should you need anything else.

      Tight lines!

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  • Albert

    Mar 10, 2019

    Hi Sean, love this article; its very informative and targeted at what, where and when…
    Regarding baitfish, I like casting for glass minnows to use for flag yellows. Is there a good spot in the mid to lower keys where there’s the best chance to catch up to them? I’ve have spotty opportunities under the bridges from the boat as well as casting from atop of the bridges. But again, it’s a hit and miss…

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      Sean

      Mar 18, 2019

      Hello Albert,

      Thank you for reading the article, I’m glad you liked it.

      For Flags, your best bet in the mid to lower Keys is Marathon. The local reefs are full of Yellowtails, and glass minnows should work great here.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Have a great day!

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    • Reply icon

      Rafael

      Apr 18, 2019

      Hello,i wanted to ask you ,if I get a gulf of Mexico Reef fish licence,,,what wood be my dividing line ,from the gulf to the Atlantic ? Could I fish some of the Atlantic side,,,?

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      Sean

      Apr 18, 2019

      Hello Rafael,

      Thanks for reading.

      Basically, anything to the south-east of Key West would be considered outside of the Gulf.

      I’m afraid that you wouldn’t be able to fish on the Atlantic side with the Gulf Reef Fish Anglers License. The license program was implemented by the FWC so that they can better understand the impact of recreational anglers’ catches on Gulf species.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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      Rafael Alvarez

      Apr 18, 2019

      So I would have to fish on the North part of all the keys right nothing on the south of the keys

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      Sean

      Apr 19, 2019

      Hello Rafael,

      Thanks for replying.

      Yes, you would need to be in Gulf waters, so to the north-west of the Keys. Please note that the Gulf Reef Fish license excludes Monroe County, so you’d probably need to go a little further out, but still within state waters.

      For more information, you can call the FWC at 850-488-4676.

      Tight lines!

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      Rafael Alvarez

      Apr 19, 2019

      How many miles off the land. Offshore

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      Sean

      Apr 22, 2019

      Hi Rafael,

      That would depend on where exactly you are in the Keys.

      Please take a look at this map provided by the FWC.

      For more information, I would advise contacting the FWC at 850-488-4676.

      Have a great day!

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      Rafael

      Apr 23, 2019

      Thanks again for your time and consideration,, that was all that I needed to know,,,,

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      Sean

      Apr 23, 2019

      You’re most welcome, Rafael.

      Tight lines!

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  • Jeff

    Mar 25, 2019

    Hi Sean,

    Very informative article. I plan to be in the Keys mid May. Is there a particular inland species you would suggest I target at that time of year and where?

    Thank you, Jeff

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      Sean

      Mar 26, 2019

      Hi Jeff,

      Thank you for reading.

      In May, you can expect some great Tarpon, Bonefish and Permit fishing on the flats of Key West. The backcountry will also be teeming with Mangrove Snapper.

      For more information, you can check out our guide for backcountry fishing in Key West.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Rodeo

    Apr 22, 2019

    I will be at Key Largo resort end of May. What fish might I be looking for if I wade off the resort beach ? Kind of like surf fishing. I’m bringing topwater, and

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      Sean

      Apr 22, 2019

      Hello Rodeo,

      Thanks for reading.

      May will be excellent for Tarpon fishing around Key Largo. You should also see an abundance of Mangrove Snapper, Snook and Gag Grouper.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Michael Dixon

    May 5, 2019

    taking daughter to marathon for first keys fishing in mid may. what fish could she catch not going out to far ? thanks

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      Sean

      May 6, 2019

      Hi Michael,

      Thanks for reading.

      In May, you and your daughter will have an excellent chance of catching Bonefish, Mutton and Yellowtail Snapper, as well as Permit.

      I’m not sure how experienced you guys are, but if you’re up for a challenge, you can also try your luck against Tarpon, as they are also on the bite in May.

      Should you need any assistance in finding a fishing charter in Marathon, please feel free to contact our Customer Service.

      Tight lines!

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  • Dan

    May 8, 2019

    Myself and 2 buddies will be staying in Islamorada for a week in mid July and we will be fishing off my small 16′ bonefisher. Any help you can provide for general locations to fish the flats and hopefully (depending on weather) fishing a wreck or the reef. We can trailer the boat anywhere but we are in Islamorada.

    Thanks

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      Sean

      May 12, 2019

      Hi Dan,

      Thanks for reading.

      There are a number of fishing spots for you to check out around Islamorada.

      Eagle wreck, for example, just off Lower Matecumbe Key is a very productive spot.

      Conch Reef is another good spot for Barracuda, Hogfish and Grouper.

      A little further down, you can check out 7 Mile Bridge for some nice Yellowtail. Also, if you don’t mind a longer ride to Key Largo, make sure to check out shipwrecks Duane and Bibb.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Have a good one!

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      Dan

      May 12, 2019

      Thanks for the info. Trying to get as much as I can before we get done there. Appreciate it

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      Sean

      May 14, 2019

      You’re most welcome, Dan.

      Have a good one!

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      Rafael H Alvarez

      May 14, 2019

      Thanks for the spots remember all these spots got to be in the Gulf side I’ll have a Gulf of Mexico reef fish license

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      Sean

      May 14, 2019

      You’re most welcome, Rafael.

      I hope that the MYFWC map will help you decide which spots you can fish on the Gulf side.

      All the best!

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  • curtis

    Jul 1, 2019

    hi this was a great read heading down to marathon in late aug and renting a boat for the week what kinda fish should i be going after any dolphin that time of year!

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      Albert

      Jul 1, 2019

      Hi Curtis,

      Thanks for the comment.

      You’re in for a treat fishing out of Marathon. You can catch anything from Mahi Mahi, Wahoo, and Tuna to Snapper and Grouper during a single outing!

      During August, you’ll have the best chances if you go reef fishing. You can target Yellowtail, Mangrove, and Mutton Snapper, as well as Tripletail, Hogfish, Grouper, and more.

      It can get too hot during the day, though, so many anglers recommend fishing during the night time or early in the morning.

      We’ve got an entire guide on fishing in marathon here, where you can find info on fishing spots, seasonality, and a whole lot more.

      I hope that helps!

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  • Sheri Montgomery

    Jul 8, 2019

    Taking our annual trip to the Keys in August, this year we are staying in Key Colony, any close wrecks or good fishing, diving spots near? My sons also like to spear fish if you have any advice on that as well.

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      Sean

      Jul 10, 2019

      Hey Sheri,

      Thanks for reading.

      The area around Key Colony actually has a few great spots for fishing, spearfishing as well as diving.

      For spearfishing and diving, you can check out the Thunderbolt or Adelaide Baker wrecks. In August, these waters hold good numbers of Yellowtail Snapper and Hogfish.

      You can also take a look at our Florida Keys Spearfishing guide for more information.

      If you’re planning on going further out, you can fish for Great Barracuda and Wahoo.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • David

    Jul 17, 2019

    Heading down to Cudjoe on Friday. Renting a 26 foot boat from the marina. Any advice on what to target? Is bait pretty easy to find or should we just purchase? Looking to do two days offshore and one day closer to Cudjoe depending on weather.

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      Albert

      Jul 19, 2019

      Hi David,

      You’re generally best off bottom fishing or staying inshore this time of year.

      On the reefs, Yellowtail, Mutton, and Mangrove Snapper should be biting hard, as well as some Hogfish and a few Black Grouper.

      Inshore, you’ve got Redfish, Bonefish, Tarpon, and Jacks.

      July is also a good time for Blue Marlin and Swordfish, although a 26′ boat will probably be a little small for that.

      I hope that helps!

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  • Alex Sanchez

    Aug 2, 2019

    Going to be in Marathon next week. Where should I start when looking for a good flat for Bones and Permit. Our boat gets skinny and she’s sneaky when being pole’d. I’ve stalked Snooks and Reds in Tampa but I’ve never fished the Keys.

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      Albert

      Aug 2, 2019

      Hi Alex,

      Sounds like you’re in for a treat!

      Around Marathon itself, the flats on the south side of Seven Mile Bridge usually hold some good Bonefish, as do the shallows in Curry Hammock State Park.

      Heading up towards Islamorada, Anne’s Beach is supposed to be an awesome spot.

      If you want more info, be sure to check out our guides to Permit and Bonefishing in the Florida Keys.

      I hope that helps!

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