Fishing in Galveston: The Complete Guide
Apr 23, 2021 | 8 minute read Comments
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Reading Time: 8 minutes

If you’re serious about angling, you know that fishing in Galveston is one of the best things a fisher could hope for. This strip of land on the Texan coast has produced more angling experts than virtually any locale in the state. And for a fishery as prolific as the Lone Star State, that’s saying a lot. What is it that makes Galveston such a good place to wet a line?

Well for one, the town is surrounded by an array of different waterways. Inshore inlets and protected bays? It’s got plenty. Nearshore reefs and deep Gulf blues? Yup. Combine this with a litany of game fish, and you’ll realize that Galveston offers almost every type of fishing under the sun. 

If the myriad of angling opportunities leaves you wondering where to begin, we don’t blame you. That’s why in this guide, we’ll show you exactly what you can catch and how. We’ll also cover where the best fishing grounds are, as well as which regulations you should keep in mind. Once you’re done reading, you’ll know exactly what fishing in Galveston is all about.

Fish Species in Galveston

A male and a female angler holding two flounder fish each

We could write a book on all the fish you can catch in Galveston. As riveting a read as that would be, we’re pretty sure that you’d rather catch these fish than read about their biology. All jokes aside, let’s see which are the signature species in Galveston, and when and where you can catch them.

Redfish and Speckled Trout

If there’s anything synonymous with Texas inshore fishing, it’s got to be Redfish and Speckled Trout. These two fish are a lot of fun to catch, and they’re abundant pretty much year-round. Better yet, Specks and Reds keep relatively close to shore, making them a perfect choice for newbies and fishing families.

three anglers on a fishing boat, each holding a redfish

There’s no wrong time to fish for Redfish and Speckled Trout, but around fall, these guys kick it up a notch. With all due respect to Specks, there’s no doubt about which fish dominates in this couple. Known for swarming the local bays during their fall migrations, Texan Bull Reds can even give experienced anglers a run their money.

Look for Reds and Specks on the grassy flats around Galveston Bay and West Bay. If you prefer to stay on land, you can catch this dynamic duo from one of Galveston’s fishing piers.

a smiling angler holding a speckled trout

Flounder

Another iconic Texan species, Flounder is a local angler’s favorite. At first glance, these guys may not look like much. Sure, their grubby flat bodies won’t win them any beauty contests. They’re not that big either. But what Flounder lack in looks, they definitely make up in cunning and flavor.

Masters of disguise, Flounder like to wiggle themselves into the soft sandy bottoms of Galveston’s shallow waters. Such a peculiar fish warrants its own fishing tactic. This is where Flounder gigging comes in. Tricky but incredibly rewarding, gigging involves spotting your Flatfish and piercing it with a spear. 

a smiling angler holding a flounder near Galveston, Texas

These trips usually take place at night, but thankfully, there are plenty of local charter guides that specialize in this kind of fishing. Flounder fishing comes to Galveston in two waves. The first, smaller wave, occurs between April and June. The second, larger wave, takes place between October and December. This is considered peak Flounder season in Galveston.

Since Flounder spawn in November, gigging is not allowed at this time. However, you can still fish them with the old pole and line.

Sharks

If you’re looking to add some excitement to your angling, Galveston’s Shark population will be happy to oblige. From small feisty Sharks inshore, to huge brutes offshore, Galveston has a Shark for every type of angler out there.

a smiling angler holding a shark on a fishing boat

Some of the Sharks you’re most likely to encounter are Blacktips, Tiger Sharks, and Hammerheads. From local piers, to artificial reefs and distant oil rigs, you’ll have no trouble finding these monsters. To catch a Shark in Galveston, time your outing between late May and September.

At the time of writing, the TPWD allowed anglers one Shark per person per day with a two-Shark possession limit.

Red Snapper

If you’re fishing for dinner, there’s no beating Red Snapper. Gutsy attitude and delicate flaky meat make this guy the most sought-after fish in the entire Gulf. It so happens that Galveston is one of the best places to catch one.

a smiling angler holding two Snapper fish

Every year, an army of hopeful anglers comes to Galveston to experience Red Snapper fishing. As you’d expect, the town has a no less impressive number of charter captains to accommodate all these eager souls. 

Now obviously, a fish this special requires strict regulations. Thankfully, Texas is traditionally looser with its seasonal and bag limits compared to other Gulf states. Fishing in state waters is open year-round, while fishing in federal waters is limited to around 60 days per year. 

two anglers holding two snapper fish each on a fishing boat

Snapper fishing laws change every year, so be sure to check the latest regulations before you head out. You should also know that there’s a limited number of captains that are licensed to take you fishing in federal waters. Snapper fishing trips sell out fast, so if you want a go at the Gulf’s most appetizing fish, book your charter in time!

Scratching the Surface

As we mentioned, the list of fish you can catch in Galveston could go on forever. Whether it’s battling Tarpon on the flats, catching Cobia and Mackerel on the reefs, or heading off to deep blue waters for Mahi and Jacks, this Texan gem has awesome angling written all over it.

Types of Fishing in Galveston

The vast network of waters around Galveston isn’t just home to a bunch of fish species. It also serves as a bona fide training ground for many types of fishing. Let’s cover some of the most popular ones.

Shore Fishing

Shore fishing is one of the most enjoyable ways to spend your time in Galveston. The fish are close, and there are plenty of spots to catch them around. The best thing about it is that you can make it entirely what you want it to be. 

North Jetty Bolivar Peninsula

Want to learn new tricks and hang out with other anglers? Head down to one of the local fishing piers. Want some quiet time instead? There are plenty of flats and inlets just outside of town.

flats on Bolivar Peninsula, with the Bolivar Point Lighthouse in the background

Kayak Fishing

Fishing from a kayak is a great way to experience Galveston’s inshore waters up close. Mostly done on the bay side of the island, kayak fishing trips will put you on the likes of Speckled Trout, Black Drum, and Redfish. Awesome fishing aside, these trips really allow you to experience the local scenery firsthand.

There are a number of launch points in town, including 8 Mile Road, Washington Park, and 103rd Street. If you’re looking to fish outside of town, check out the North Jetty on Bolivar or Pelican Island. 

Charter Fishing

Without a doubt, shore fishing and kayak fishing are a lot of fun. But if you’re looking to experience fishing in Galveston to the fullest, only one thing can fit the bill. 

a fishing boat full of angler in Galveston, Texas

Galveston fishing charters are among the best in the entire Gulf, hands down. The sheer variety of species you can catch and the overall feeling of adventure are pretty much unrivaled.

Several things make an outing on a fishing charter a special experience. Number one, your captain. As one of the Gulf’s most productive fisheries, Galveston has no shortage of expert charter guides. These guys hook more fish in a season than most of us will in a lifetime, so you can bet that they know what they’re talking about.

anglers holding a blackfin tuna on a fishing charter in Galveston, Texas

Number two, your boat. Charter boats in Galveston cover all your gear needs, as well as a few optional extras. Depending on the fishing trip you’re after, you can go out on a basic flats boat, or a powerful deluxe vessel stacked with the latest electronics and all the amenities you can think of.

Galveston Fishing Spots

As we mentioned, Galveston has no shortage of productive fishing locales. Unless you’re fishing with a seasoned guide, you’ll need to know at least a couple of these honey holes yourself. Thankfully, the local bait and tackle shops will gladly sell you a guide map with the most fruitful locations. The TPWD even has an interactive map listing many of the Gulf’s sweet spots.

a view of Galveston Bay, Texas

From the Shore

We could write a whole book on the best shore fishing sites in Galveston. To get you started, here are some of the most prolific spots to check out:

  • 61 St. Fishing Pier and Galveston Fishing Pier – Two very productive fishing spots, great for catching Redfish, Black Drum, Spanish Mackerel, and Blacktip Sharks. Both piers are equipped with bait and tackle shops.
  • Seawolf Park – Located on Pelican Island, this is a good spot for Black Drum and Redfish. There are fish cleaning stations and restrooms nearby.
  • Galveston Island State Park – A good license-free spot for Redfish and Speckled Trout. There’s a camping area with showers and cookout facilities on site.

From a Boat

For inshore fishing, check out Hanna’s Reef in East Bay. This is a good spot for Redfish and Specks. If the waters are calm, you can check out West Bolivar Flats, just outside the Bay. And if you want something closer to home, give the sandy flats around Pelican Island a go.

Nearshore fishing will typically take you several miles into the Gulf. These trips are your chance to land fish like Kingfish, Cobia, Wahoo, Mahi, and Sharks. Look for artificial reefs and shipwrecks, these waters are dotted with hundreds of them!

Offshore fishing is all about catching the largest predators you can find. This is big boy territory, and we’re talking angler and fish alike. Monsters like Blackfin Tuna, Ling, as well as huge Jacks and Mahi are all here for the taking. Offshore trips can take you anywhere from 60 to 100 miles to sea, but the long ride is more than worth it. 

two anglers holding a large amberjack on a fishing charter near Galveston, Texas

One of the most popular places for offshore fishing is the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary, 100 miles from Galveston. The series of underwater mountains and reef-building corals attract a real who’s-who of the marine world.

Licenses

Unlike some other Gulf states, Texas fishing charters don’t cover your fishing license. In other words, if you’re age 17 or older, you’ll need to purchase a permit to fish in Texas. One exception to this rule is that you don’t need a license to fish from banks or piers in any of the Texan State Parks. To learn more about licensing, check out our in-depth guide.

a smiling angler holding a redfish with the sun setting in the background

By now, we’re pretty sure that you can see how special fishing in Galveston can be. From its numerous fishing grounds to the unrivaled bounty it offers, this town will redefine your idea of “good fishing.” 

Got questions about fishing in Galveston? Or an awesome angling story you’d like to share? Drop us your thoughts in the comments below!

Comments (56)
  • Rodney Lamb

    Oct 7, 2021

    Great write-up.
    Rving mid December with my brothers family at RV resort and marina. Want to take my nephew on a bay redfish and trout 1/2 day trip during the week. Would also like to consider a walking gigging trip at night with him.

    Timing? Thoughts? Guide recommendations for these?

    Thanks
    Rodney

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      Sean

      Oct 7, 2021

      Hi Rodney,

      Thanks for reading.

      Reds and Trout are most active during tidal movements, so this would be the ideal time to target them. There’s no shortage of local guides that offer half day trips. While mornings and evenings can both be productive, the water should be a little warmer in the afternoon, which should make for a good inshore bite.

      Here’s a list of local captains that target the fish you’re after. I’d recommend contacting them through the website to inquire about your trip details. I’m sure that they’ll be able to recommend a few good gigging spots, too.

      I hope you’ll have a great time.

      Tight lines!

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  • Marcos Rodrigues

    Jul 30, 2021

    Hey, planning to go to Galveston mid- late October. What are the target fish around that time of year. Could also give us suggestions for charters for it?
    Thanks
    MRod

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      Sean

      Aug 2, 2021

      Hi MRod,

      Thanks for reading.

      October is all about inshore fishing. This time of year brings a good Redfish and Speckled Trout bite. It also happens to be the best time to catch Flounder.

      You can take a look at some of the best local inshore fishing guides here.

      Feel free to contact each captain through their listing pages to find the one that’s best suited for your needs.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful. We’re here should you need any assistance.

      Tight lines!

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  • Zach Petersen

    May 31, 2021

    I can’t wait to hit the gulf with my two boys! We’re staying at Bolivar RV park and heading out with Get Hooked charters. I haven’t been to the ocean/gulf since I lived in Virginia 20 years ago. I can’t wait to make some awesome memories with them on Tuesday. We’re going about 9 miles out. I really wanna see one of them drag a shark in. Is there a decent chance of that this time of year?

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      Sean

      Jun 1, 2021

      Hi Zach,

      Thanks for reading.

      You’ve picked the right time to go Shark fishing! Blacktip and Tiger Sharks are both in season at this time, and you’ll be able to encounter some pretty big ones if you’re going 9 miles out.

      Hope you’ll have a great time – tight lines!

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  • David C

    May 9, 2021

    This was a great read Sean, thanks for the info!
    With that, I will be down next month in a rental house in Jamaica Beach on a canal. I’ll have my grand kids with me and am looking for some advise on a good setup (shrimp on hook with slip bobber, etc) for fishing from the dock on the canal (and the canal does have lights for night fishing). I’ve done a lot of inland fishing but it’s been years (a whole lot of them) since I’ve done any kind of fishing down on the coast.
    I know that was kind of a vague question but any info or advice would be greatly appreciated!

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      Sean

      May 10, 2021

      Hi David,

      Thanks for reading.

      Canal fishing in Jamaica Beach should give you a good chance of catching Redfish, Speckled Trout and possibly Flounder if you’re fishing at night.

      In terms of presentation, Redfish and Trout should react really well to live shrimp. Since you’re making your presentation vertically, I’d recommend using a J hook. Carolina rigs work well in these applications, with 20 lb braid for your main line.

      I hope this helps.

      Tight lines!

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  • Ed Diller

    May 4, 2021

    My grandson and I will be in the area from June 12 to June 14 and would like to get in 2 1/2 day charters for near shore fishing. What kind of fish can we expect.

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      Sean

      May 4, 2021

      Hi Ed,

      Thanks for reaching out.

      Mid-June is perhaps the best time to fish in Galveston. Near shore fishing will give you a chance to land Cobia, Kingfish and Spanish Mackerel, to name a few.

      Here’s a list of fishing charters you can choose from for your dates.

      Let me know if there’s anything else I can help you with. You can also contact any captain you’re interested in to inquire about specific species they’d recommend going after.

      I hope that helps.

      Tight lines!

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  • Steve

    Apr 12, 2021

    Will be staying at Galveston KOA from 5/27-6/27. Are there any Pompano or Whiting in the surf at that time? If not what is? Experienced at fishing the beaches in Gulf Shores/Orange Beach but decided to go somewhere different this summer. Thanks in advance!

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      Sean

      Apr 12, 2021

      Hi Steve,

      Thanks for reading.

      Pompano and Whiting aren’t really abundant in June, so it’s better not to expect a reliable bite.

      There are however, good numbers of Speckled Trout and Spanish Mackerel that you can consistently catch in the surf. Smaller Blacktips are also known to come close to the shore during this time.

      Hope you have a great summer in Texas. Tight lines!

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      Randy

      Apr 19, 2021

      Hi, do you know of any charters that can accommodate a party of 7? They all seem limited to 6 adults.

      Thanks!

      Randy

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      Sean

      Apr 19, 2021

      Hi Randy,

      Thanks for reading.

      I’m afraid that almost every fishing charter in the Gulf can carry up to 6 passengers on board. This is because the captains’ fishing licenses allow them to have this many people on the vessel – they are literally known as 6-pack licenses. Places like Florida have shared charters with higher boat capacities, but those aren’t a thing in Texas, I’m afraid.

      In this case, the best thing I can advise for your party is to book two boats to go out together.

      I hope you’ll have a great time.

      Tight lines!

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      Jeff

      Apr 26, 2021

      Going to be in Tarama Beach May 10. Will be in house on one of the canals.what kind of fish can we catch in canals

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      Sean

      Apr 27, 2021

      Hi Jeff,

      Thanks for reading.

      Fishing on the canals will give you a chance to catch Redfish and Speckled Trout, and possibly Flounder. Shrimp should work well for all of them, but you can also ask at the local tackle shop to see what’s been working lately.

      Tight lines!

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      Michelle

      May 3, 2021

      My family will be staying in Sea Isle from May 21 – 28. Would the Sea Isle Pier or shore fishing be more likely to give us success? We aren’t experienced with salt water fishing. Any suggestions on rigs or anything else would be appreciated! Thanks

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      Sean

      May 4, 2021

      Hi Michelle,

      Thanks for reading.

      Fishing from Sea Isle Pier should give you plenty of opportunities to catch fish. Some of the species you can expect to see are Trout, Sheepshead, Flounder, and Drum.

      As far as presentations go, I’d recommend using a longer rod if you can, something like a 8 or 9′ medium to medium-light rod should serve you well, especially if you pair it with a Carolina rig with 20 lb braid and a fluoro leader. Check this article out to see how to make a Carolina rig.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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      Donald

      May 8, 2021

      What are some good non crowded surf fishing spots in Galveston me and my wife can go fo Somme good fishing cuz the piers are too crowded to catch anything gud Just hard heads and gafftops, thanks

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      Sean

      May 10, 2021

      Hi Donald,

      Thanks for reading.

      One place you should definitely give a go is Galveston Island State Park. It’s an expansive and really productive spot. You could also try Seawolf Park. For surf fishing spots, I recommend checking out the comment section on our Galveston Pier Fishing article. There are a few really good suggestions here.

      I hope you’ll have a great time.

      Tight lines!

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  • Dan

    Mar 14, 2021

    Is fishing by boat legal in neighborhoods along Galveston West Bay like Tiki Island, Bayou Vista and Harbor Walk? I was on my boat and kicked out of Harbor Walk (threatened with police) stating that the whole place is private property.

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      Sean

      Mar 16, 2021

      Hi Dan,

      Thanks for reading.

      As far as I’m aware, boat fishing around Tiki Island is illegal for non-residents.

      According to the Municode Library: “No nonresident will be allowed to operate, anchor or dock a commercial fishing or fishing guide boat in any manner in any waterway within the village.”

      With that in mind, perhaps your best bet would be to try fishing in Galveston Island State Park. Make sure to check the regulations before you head out.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Have a good one!

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  • Nathan

    Mar 6, 2021

    Is there a spot where you can clean your fish by pier on 61st?

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      Albert

      Mar 8, 2021

      Hi Nathan,

      There’s an area with running water that you can use to clean your gear, I don’t think it’s meant for cleaning fish, though. Maybe give them a call and ask? Otherwise, Galveston Fishing Pier definitely does have them.

      Tight lines!

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  • Christina

    Feb 23, 2021

    Great article! I want to take my son to Galveston to fish off the pier for the weekend. Is the places to rent to stay and walk out to fish on pier?

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      Albert

      Feb 23, 2021

      Hi Christina,

      Sounds like a great vacation! I’m sure you can find somewhere to rent nearby.

      If you want more info on the local piers, feel free to check out our Galveston pier fishing article, too.

      Tight lines!

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  • Chase

    Jan 28, 2021

    Great article! Love fishing in Galveston and Crystal Beach area but have been trying to find a good place to castanet for bait fish. Any suggestion on that? Thanks!

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      Sean

      Feb 1, 2021

      Hi Chase,

      Thanks for reading, I’m glad you liked the article!

      A couple of good places you can check out are the North Jetty on Bolivar and the Galveston Rock groins just off the Seawall Blvd.

      Both spots are very productive for catching finger mullet. Just keep an eye out for rocks – the last thing you want is to snag your castnet.

      Hope this helps.

      Have a good one!

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  • Jeff

    Jan 10, 2021

    I am an avid fly fisherman from the MO/Arkansas region. I’ve never been salt water fly fishing before and want to take my nephew to the Galveston area as he lives in Texas. Can anyone give me info on what’s the best time of year to go and any recommendations on a guide to take us salt water fly fishing? Thanks so much – tight lines!!!

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      Sean

      Jan 13, 2021

      Hi Jeff,

      Thanks for reaching out!

      There’s a lot to choose from, but the go-to choice for most fly fishers is Redfish. Reds are particularly abundant around October.

      I’ve forwarded your inquiry to our customer support team, so that they can assist you with some recommendations. You can expect an email very soon.

      Tight lines!

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  • Madeleine Miller

    Dec 28, 2020

    Great article, but had a few questions! I’m heading down in a few days and will be staying on a canal in Sea Isle. What should I expect from canal fishing, in terms of bait and fish? Also are there any regulations specifically for fishing off of private property in the canal? Thanks so much, can’t wait to get down there!

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      Albert

      Dec 29, 2020

      Hi Madeleine,

      The main winter targets in Galveston’s canals will be Trout, Sheepshead, Flounder, and Drum. The best all-round bait for them is shrimp, although any fresh live bait should work well.

      In terms of regulations, there are no special rules for fishing saltwater from private property. You still need a fishing license and all limits and seasons are the same.

      I hope that helps. Be sure to let us know how you get on!

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  • Rickey

    Nov 24, 2020

    I will be in Galveston between Christmas and New Years. Looking to do some shore fishing. What can I expect around this time and where are some easy relaxing places to wet a hook? Thanks in advance.

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      Sean

      Nov 24, 2020

      Hi Rickey,

      Thanks for reading.

      Fishing in late December will give you a chance to catch some nice Flounder. If that’s not your thing, there’s always a chance of hooking some Redfish or Speckled Trout.

      The most convenient place to catch a fish is one of the local fishing piers. Two of the best known piers, 61 St. Fishing Pier and Galveston Fishing Pier will have everything you need in terms of bait and tackle. If you’d like to avoid the crowds, you can check out Sea Isle Pier and fish the bay.

      Last but not least, you can fish in Galveston Island State Park. There will surely be a nice relaxing spot in the park, and the fishing is great, too.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Annie Shepherd

    Sep 12, 2020

    Hi,

    I’m looking to book a fishing charter sometime in October and November. Is there a specific time that would yield more fish? For instance, earlier in the fall vs later?

    And what about time of day? Would it be smarter to book a morning trip or an afternoon one? (I’m looking at the 4 hour options)

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      Sean

      Sep 15, 2020

      Hi Annie,

      Thanks for reading.

      Generally speaking, early to mid-fall will give you a bigger variety of species to catch. You’ll have Redfish, Speckled Trout, Flounder and even Tarpon to choose from.

      As far as which time of day to choose, it’s best to time your outing for when the tides are changing. In the fall, fishing at sundown is a great because the waters have had enough time to warm up during the day. If the weather is unusually cold, it’s better to go around midday because the water is warmer at this time, and the fish will likely be more active.

      The only exception here is Flounder, which you can also fish for at nighttime.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Carol M Brown

    Sep 12, 2020

    Hi Sean,
    My husband build a fishing rack on the back of our jet ski and I have to admit, it’s pretty sweet. We took it out to Dickinson Bayou and Moses Lake around 7am today and fished until 4pm. Not much fishing action as I would have liked. We starting getting a little action around 3pm and caught one red fish and mostly small croakers. We fished with live and dead shrimp, cut bait and a few plastics. Can you recommend some good spots in and around the bay area we can navigate with our jet ski?

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      Sean

      Sep 15, 2020

      Hi Carol,

      Wow, that sounds like a lot of fun!

      If you’re looking for something close by, head for the boat ramp on Texas City Dike. Alternatively, you can give East Bay a try. There are several launch points on Bolivar Peninsula, as well as a few decent bait and tackle shops if you need to stock up.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Frank

    Aug 11, 2020

    Hello,
    I live over in Lott, TX. and would love to do some surf fishing, can you recommend any spots in Galveston and some good places for fisherman to stay?

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      Sean

      Aug 12, 2020

      Hi Frank,

      Thanks for reading.

      For surf fishing, I’d recommend checking out Jamaica Beach. Not only is this a popular spot for anglers, but you’ll also be able to find some nice beach rentals nearby, too.

      You can also try wading from one of the uninhabited areas down near Baywater Drive.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Jon

    Jul 12, 2020

    Great article! We’ll be staying in Pointe West next week and plan on fly fishing in the flats. I’ve heard chartreuse clouser minnows work well. Any tips such as the best time of the day or other areas?

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      Sean

      Jul 16, 2020

      Hi Jon,

      Thanks for reading!

      Fly fishing is generally speaking best during early morning and late evening, when mosquitos and other insects are most active.

      I’d recommend checking out Galveston Island State Park. If you’re planning on fishing open waters, check out the local tides and currents.

      Tight lines!

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      Cynthia

      Aug 6, 2020

      My daughter, grand daughter and I are heading to Galveston tomorrow and I hope to fish from ANYWHERE…I just read that the GI State Park is closed due to renovations. What weight and type of line would you suggest for me to switch my gear to? This is the first time I’m going post-divorce and I relied to heavily on him for this type of knowledge.

      Do I need metal leads, what size weight, bait (all I have is large mouth bass lures).

      Thanks!

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      Sean

      Aug 7, 2020

      Hi Cynthia,

      Thanks for reading.

      There are loads of productive fishing spots around Galveston, but since you’re visiting with your daughter and granddaughter, I’d recommend checking out one of the town’s fishing piers.

      We’ve actually written a whole article about them, so do check it out. Pro tip: The comments section has a wealth of useful information. You can also check out our Pier Fishing Tips article for additional pointers.

      As far as your gear is concerned, I’d recommend going with a 20-30 lb mono. You can catch some nice Reds with this type of line. Unless you’re strictly doing catch&release, I’d also recommend using a J hook, because they work better when fishing from a pier.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Shane

    Jul 3, 2020

    Rollover pass has been closed for over a year.

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      Sean

      Jul 3, 2020

      Hi Shane,

      You’re right, thanks for pointing that out!

      We’ve update the article now.

      Thanks again, and tight lines!

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      Linda

      Jul 5, 2020

      What’s the best time to go fish on the pier ?

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      Sean

      Jul 6, 2020

      Hi Linda,

      Thanks for reading.

      Typically, dawn and dusk are the best times to drop a line from a pier. This is when fish come out to feed and are generally most active.

      Dawn and dusk can be equally productive, but in the summertime, it might be a good idea to go out early in the morning if you want to avoid the heat.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • DRo

    Jun 19, 2020

    Looking for Info on “access points” into lower West Bay from the ICW coming from Surfside.

    I am aware of the Sea Isle pass and Greens but I would like to know a way into West Bay from the South. Charts show enough water near entrance to Chocolate Bay but it also shows there to be a bunch of obstructions in that area.

    Any idea about coordinates? Any help will be greatly appreciated.

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      Sean

      Jun 19, 2020

      Hi there,

      Thanks for reading.

      That’s a tricky one, to be honest. Access points are limited that far south, especially with wading being prohibited around San Luis Pass.

      Your best bet is to try a bit further north at Sea Isle Pier at 29° 9′ 4 N, 95° 2′ 50 W. An alternative solution is to wade from one of the uninhabited areas off of Baywater Drive.

      Hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Brian Lawson

    Jun 11, 2020

    Sean: thanks for taking the time to gather all this information in one spot!
    I’ll be making my first trip to Galveston in a few weeks and I’m hoping you can point me toward some additional resources. I’d like to charter fish in the bay, or around the jetties, but I’m solo angler (unless I force my wife to go). Is there a trip aggregator who puts like minded solo fisherman together in the Galveston area? Or, maybe there are some discussion boards where I might find another 1-2 people looking to share a trip? Thanks in advance for any help you may provide.

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      Albert

      Jun 11, 2020

      Hi Brian,

      Several charters offer shared trips in Galveston. I’d recommend contacting a couple of them and talking through your dates to see if they have other guests for when you’re in town.

      Let us know how you get on.

      Tight lines!

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      Tim Beck

      Jul 9, 2020

      Brian, I’m going to Galveston the week of 7/20-24th
      I’m bringing my Kayak to do a bit of fishing
      I’d split a bay character with you if it’s not priced crazy.
      I’ve learned it’s worth the money to do one and then you know where to go Kayak fishing the rest of the time your there.
      I’m not sure the dates you’re going to be there but if your interested email me I’ll send a number to text

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      Jimmy N

      Jul 11, 2020

      Hey Tim, ill be in Houston at the end of the month and will also be bringing some kayaks to fish. Could you keep me updated at fishing spots for kayaking.

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  • Jeff Hill

    May 19, 2020

    Im new to texas much less Galveston, im haveing a hard time understanding some of the regulations there,me and my wife and family have a hotel off the beach this weekend and iwanted to no if i can fish and gig flounder at the beach,could someone give me a solid answere to this bc im not wanting no trouble,please an thank you

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      Sean

      May 20, 2020

      Hi Jeff,

      Thanks for asking.

      You can legally fish for Flounder off the beach, but there are a few guidelines that you’ll need to follow. For example, you can have a maximum of four people with you (from the same household). According to the Texas Department of State Health Services, wearing face masks is recommended, but not mandatory. This is the full list of DSHS recommendations.

      You should know that some access points could be closed at this time. I’d advise asking for details at your hotel.

      As for Flounder, the daily bag limit is 5 fish, with a minimum length requirement of 14 inches (subject to change, check here for updates)

      Last but not least, you will need a fishing license. You can order your license here.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful, Jeff.

      Tight lines!

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