Guide to Tampa Bay Fishing
May 15, 2019 | 8 minute read Comments
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Reading Time: 8 minutes

With over 200 species inhabiting its bait-laden waterways, Tampa Bay fishing is rightly revered as the crown jewel among Florida anglers.

An aerial view of the Tampa Bay with the Tampa skyline in the distance

But why is that exactly? What is it about the greater Tampa Bay area that makes it one of the nation’s most prolific fish traps? Well, as it turns out, being the largest open-water estuary in all of the Sunshine State definitely comes with its perks.

Tampa Bay Basics

Extending over 400 square miles and fed by the emerald waters of the Gulf of Mexico, the entire bay and its tributaries act as a reliably diverse game fish nursery. This is already a feat in and of itself. As any seasoned angler will attest, most top-tier fisheries struggle with maintaining the variety of its celebrated fish stock.

Tampa Bay’s massive ecosystem, on the other hand, plays host to pretty much all of the state’s favorite bruisers. When locals say there’s something in these waters for everyone, you better be sure they mean it.

Be it Clearwater, St Pete, Tampa itself, Bradenton or Sarasota, there’s no shortage of hotspots that fish well throughout the calendar year. Here, we’ll cover some of the area’s most popular species and dominant fishing techniques. We also might just give you a reason or two to put Tampa Bay fishing at the top of this year’s bucket list.

Species and Seasonality

If it swims in the shallows and lives in the Gulf, you can prety much guarantee it’s in these waters. The Bay provides such a wide variety of aquatic life, it’s not uncommon to bag more than a dozen species on any given outing. The mighty Snook prowls the mangrove shorelines. Schools of tailing Redfish rest on the glassy grass flats. And the notorious Florida Tarpon roam the Bay’s endless passes. Whatever you’re after, it’s never more than a cast away.

However, these grounds are home to much more than just the traditional heavy-hitters. The local species also include Trout, Jack Crevalle, Grouper, Snapper, Cobia, Ladyfish, Mackerel, Flounder, and a variety of Sharks. All of these and many more call Tampa Bay their home throughout different parts of the year.

This is also how the area manages to cater to anglers of virtually all ages and skill levels. Anything from a 2 lb Pompano to a 200 lb+ Tarpon can be caught on the local waterways. It all depends on the type of experience you’re after.

Tarpon

An angler on a Tampa Bay fishing trip fighting a Tarpon which is jumping out of the water.

Move over, Boca Grande. Over the years, Tampa Bay has repeatedly proven its reputation as one of the richest Silver King battlegrounds along Florida’s Gulf Coast.

The traditional Tarpon season spans from April all the way to August. However, the Bay is usually considered a strong late summer Tarpon fishery as well. Multiple hook-ups are usually recorded well into October.

On a particularly good year, the season can last up to 7-8 months. As any angler half worth his bait knows, that’s hardly standard for any Tarpon fishery. Does someone you care about suffer from a seemingly unbreakable ‘Tarpon curse’? Bring him to Tampa Bay. He should be completely cured within a day or two.

Throughout peak migration (May-July), most Tarpon range between 80 and 140 pounds. Still, you’ll probably hear of folks joining the coveted ‘200 club’ every now and again. If you’re specifically booking a Tarpon charter, expect an average of 2-7 hookups per trip. Days with more than 10 hookups are certainly not unheard of, either. In the end, it all depends on your own expertise and a lil’ bit of luck.

If you ever battled a Tarpon before, you know this is one durable trophy fish. Most fights last from 20 to 40 minutes, although you should try and end the struggle as soon as possible. Other than ensuring the fish’s survival, this also helps in avoiding the Sharks. The toothy terrors are hardly scarce around here.

All Tarpon fishing is catch and release, unless you’re in pursuit of an IGFA record (which does require a special tag). If you are – good luck!

Redfish (Red Drum)

An angler holding a Redfish on a flats fishing boat in the Tampa Bay.

Nobody does Redfishing quite like Florida.

Undoubtedly a skinny-water favorite, the resident Redfish is happy to chase down a plug any day of the year. With unparalleled stamina and a reel-smoking tenacity, Redfish is certainly the king of Tampa Bay flats.

Throughout most of the year, the species are caught in very shallow grass flats, up to 3ft. deep. Even though most fisheries go into deep hibernation during the winter months, the tailing Reds of Tampa Bay remain very much active. That said, they usually migrate to deeper waters at this time, normally between 4 and 8 feet.

Most Reds caught in the Tampa Bay area measure around 15-35 inches (the legal size limit is 18-27 inches.). Due to the species’ prevalence, the season stays open all year round!

There are plenty of captains willing to clean and fillet the fish for you following the trip. Unlike Tarpon, Reds make for delicious table fare. In fact, many of the local restaurants will be more than happy to cook your catch. How’s that for a fresh lunch?

Red Drum typically congregate in many of the same places as Trout and Snook. If you’re looking for monster Reds though, they usually rally a few miles off the beaches or near the various ship channels. Happy hunting!

Snook

An angler holding a Snook in Tampa Bay, with a fly fishing rod resting over his shoulder and water and sky in the background

Another one of Florida’s staple game fish, this backcountry brawler thrives in virtually all parts of the Bay. The elusive Snook is caught anywhere from beaches to docks, mangroves, jetties and seawalls. Safe to say, it is uniquely flexible in finding itself a nourishing habitat.

To get the most out of Snook fishing in Tampa Bay, you’ll want to target the beaches, residential docks and mangrove shorelines. Stocking the livewell with pilchards or scaled sardines (their favorite) is always a good choice. If you prefer artificials, plugs and jigs typically do the job just as well.

Although readily available year round, spring through fall gives anglers the best chance to limit out on Snook. Their metabolism tends to slow down significantly during the cooler months. While they’ll still blast your plug every now and again, winter is typically better spent pursuing other species (see above!)

For Snook enthusiasts that would rather avoid the summer heat, night fishing is a highly-productive alternative. Snook are nocturnal and generally prefer to feed at night anyway. You’ll typically find them scouting for dinner underneath the dock lights.

Other inshore species

A fisherman on a boat holding a Speckled Seatout with a fly in its mouth

It’s no secret that the ‘Big 3’ garner the most attention from visiting anglers eager to explore Tampa Bay’s inshore fisheries. Still, there are plenty of other line-melting game fish scavenging the Bay to break the monotony.

First up on the list, Spotted Seatrout is quite likely the most abundant sport fish in all of Tampa Bay. Not unlike Redfish, Trout is great to eat and can be found rummaging the shallow flats all throughout the year. They also like drifting to deeper waters (up to 15ft) during the cooler months.

Raising Seatrout is made easy with greenback or shrimp, although they’ll typically jump on any well-presented bait. According to the FWC, keepers must be more than 15 and less than 20 inches in total length. There is a daily bag limit of 6 per angler.

Sheepshead, another winter bruiser, are best targeted January through March. They can be found underneath the bridges, docks or even on the nearshore reefs. Ranging anywhere from 1-5 pounds, what they lack in size they more than make up for in being positively delicious.

A family on a fishing trip in Tampa Bay each holding a Sheepshead fish

Perhaps one of the most underrated Bay fish, Black Drum are incredibly fun to catch. Also, as they can be anything from a few pounds to 90 lb+ monsters, you never know what you may find on the other end of the line. Typically found in larger concentrations throughout the winter months, they’re a sucker for shrimp and gather around docks and in shallow waters.

Everyone’s favorite bycatch, fishing for Flounder is a year-long festival. This is one species where double digit hook-ups are considered the norm on a good day. Often joining them on a dinner plate, Pompano is considered a worthy opponent by most veteran fisherfolk. They’re usually scouted along the beaches or near the bridge pilings, depending on the season.

Finally, it wouldn’t be Tampa Bay fishing without some spectacular Shark action. Bulls, Hammerheads, Blacktips, Tigers and several other Shark species dominate the local waterways.

Nearshore fishing

Why should the party stop when you step outside the Bay?

Offshore fishing charters typically depart from St Petersburg and Clearwater. These trips offer a unique opportunity to leave the coastline behind and explore the notorious Gulf of Mexico. Game fish abound in the waters of the Gulf, with its countless wrecks, reefs, ledges, hard bottoms and copious weed lines.

Each year, the bait-rich waterways of the Gulf attract a wide roster of pelagics and other predatory fish. Surface feeders such as Kingfish, Barracuda, Permit and Dorado all prosper throughout the summer months. Although live bait is preferred, these drag-stripping machines will rarely resist a fine-looking ‘topwater’ either.

Bottom fishermen are likely to have their hands full as well. These waters are home to the likes of Red Snapper, Gag Grouper, Cobia, Amberjack, Flounder, Goliath Grouper and plenty of other rock dwellers.

It’s worth noting that the open season for some of the Gulf species tends to be very limited. It’s always a good idea to check with your captain or the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission before making the charter arrangements.

Tampa Bay fishing methods and techniques

Although primarily a light tackle fishery, there are plenty of novelty fishing styles to explore in the Tampa Bay area. Starting with:

Fly Fishing

An fly fisherman holding up of a Redfish in one hand and a fly fishing rod in the other

For whatever reason, Tampa Bay is often unjustly overlooked as a premier fly fishing destination. It can certainly be hard to compete with the traditional heavyweights such as Homosassa and the Florida Keys. However, the relatively-untapped potential of the Bay should make it incredibly appealing to real fly enthusiasts everywhere.

Almost all of the area’s most popular species can be targeted on fly. This includes Tarpon, Redfish, Snook, Seatrout, Cobia, and more. The water clears up significantly Fall through Spring, allowing for an unparalleled sight fishing experience. While mainly an inshore activity, there’s no shortage of nearshore fly fishing opportunities either. Among others, Mackerel and Albacore are well known to take an inviting fly.

Naturally, Tarpon tops the list for most fly fisherfolk. Most captains recommend using 10-12 weight fly rods, just in case you come across a trophy-sized Silver King. If you prefer to use lighter rods, Snook and Seatrout are definitely the go-to species.

Night Fishing

As summer heats up, night fishing quickly becomes one of Floridians’ favorite pastimes.

Not only is fishing during the night convenient, it also makes sense. Most species are nocturnal and prefer to feed when the sun goes down. This rings especially true during the hottest months of the year.

Night fishing is great for targeting Tarpon around bridges or chasing after Snook underneath the dock lights. Either way, a demand for this fishing niche has been welcomed by light tackle and fly fishermen alike.

Bowfishing

No archery experience required! You’ll be ‘fishing’ for Mullet, Sheepshead, Mangrove Snapper, Flounder and of course, Rays.

To experience bowfishing in all its glory, many captains recommend opting for a nightly excursion. While daytime trips average around 50 shots per ‘angler’, that number can as much as double once it gets dark.

Sightseeing and Nature Exploration

Two manatees foraging for food underwater

At the end of the day, fishing in Tampa Bay is always more than just the sum of its parts. The bay supports a vibrant ecosystem abundant with wildlife, endemic species, and all sorts of unique natural wonders.

A fishing trip along these white sandy beaches and mangrove shorelines always doubles as a premier nature tour. Don’t be surprised if your charter gets briefly interrupted by curious dolphins, hungry manatees, or flocks of exotic birds. Top that off with some of the most magnificent sunrises and sunsets anywhere on the West Coast, and you’ve got yourself a one-of-a-kind fishing experience, bar none.

Want to know more about the thrills of Tampa Bay fishing? Let us know in the comments below!

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Comments (22)
  • Gabriel

    Jan 27, 2016

    Thanks for the lesson 🙂

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      Xavier

      Feb 2, 2016

      Thanks for reading!

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  • Allen Osborne

    Jul 1, 2017

    Enjoyed all the information in this article. Our trip will be in February 2018. I normally fish fresh water lakes in several states for bass and specs and have enjoyed many years of fishing Lake Erie for walleye, perch and small and large mouth bass. Looking forward to learning the different spices in and around the bay. God bless and happy fishing Al Osborne.

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      Cat

      Jul 4, 2017

      Thanks for your comment, I’m glad you found the article useful!

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  • Courtney

    Aug 1, 2017

    I really enjoyed reading this article! Great photos! I had no idea that Tampa offered such great fishing. I have been to Tampa hundreds of times, but I haven’t fished there once. I will definitely put it on my list of things to do for next time I visit.

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  • Randy Scott uni

    Apr 1, 2018

    Like your reading

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  • Gary Brady

    Aug 11, 2018

    Moving to Ruskin area – where are local areas I can flyfish? Is Apollo Beach open for fishing? Your blog is very helpful.

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      Stefan

      Aug 29, 2018

      Hi, Gary,

      Thanks for reading. I’m glad you found the blog useful!

      Ruskin is a great place for fly fishing. You will find shallow waters, mangrove estuaries, grass beds, flats, and backcountry waters. All these spots work great. You can find a consistent Snook, Redfish, and Trout bite.

      You can sure fish the waters around Apollo Beach. There are a couple of power plants with piers, and surf and wade fishing won’t let you down either. You can get Pompano, Jacks, Flounder.

      Locals also fish the EG Simmons Park, the entrance feed used to be about $2. With little bit of luck, you could find monster Reds there.

      Hope this helps.
      If you have any more questions, feel free to reach out.

      Tight lines,
      Stefan

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      TGCarlson

      May 16, 2019

      Around Apollo Beach, I assume the fishing is restricted around the power plant. How accessible is the shoreline. Best flys for pompano and jacks? Also is it worthwhile trolling across the bay to St. Petes. What kind of plugs…
      Nice article, thanks.

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      Sean

      May 17, 2019

      Hello Carlson,

      Thanks for reading, I’m glad you like the article.

      Yes, there is a restricted area around the power plant. The most accessible area around the plant (and the most pleasing to the eye) is the Apollo Beach Preserve.

      For Pompano and Jacks, I would recommend going with weighted flies that imitate jigs that were proven to work, like the Nylure.

      Trolling in the Bay will give you a great chance to catch some Spanish Mackerel. Plugs like Gotcha should work great on them.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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  • Ricardo Carmouche'

    Mar 21, 2019

    Can you recommend any great fishing spots where snakes and alligators would not be a concern with kids. Will be vacationing in the Tampa/Land O’ Lakes area in early July 2019. Would prefer fresh water over salt water. Thank you

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      Sean

      Mar 22, 2019

      Hello Ricardo,

      Thank you for reading the blog.

      There are a number of great freshwater fishing spots in the area. If you would like to avoid snakes and alligators, I would recommend going for a bigger lake with a good boat ramp.

      For example, Lake Tarpon is just half an hour away, and is one of the best Bass fishing lakes in Florida. You’ll also have a good chance of landing Bluegill and Crappie.

      Curve Lake and King Lake offer a more serene experience, but it would be worth checking for any recent snake reports once you get there.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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      Ricardo Carmouche

      Apr 4, 2019

      Thank you – are you suggesting fishing in close proximity to the boat ramps?

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      Sean

      Apr 8, 2019

      Hello Ricardo,

      Thank you for your reply.

      Not necessarily, you’ll be avoiding snakes and alligators if you venture further out, plus you’ll be able to catch Largemouth Bass during the summer months. You’ll either find them hunting shad in open water, or lurking near structure on the bottom.

      I hope this helps.

      Tight lines!

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  • Leon

    Apr 10, 2019

    This is great information, I use my Tampa Bay fishing chart (https://waterproofcharts.com/product/tampa-bay-area-inshore-fishing-chart-22f/) as a starting point for reference when I head out for some snook or redfish but I will definitely take into account some of your advice next time I head to Tampa for fishing.

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      Sean

      Apr 12, 2019

      Hey Leon,

      Thanks for reading, I’m glad you found it useful.

      That’s a great chart. You can also check this one out, from the myfwc website.

      Tight lines!

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  • Walter

    Aug 1, 2019

    Hi sean i will spent my holiday this year in august in cape coral. I looking for tarpon spots where i can try to catch some one from the beach with my fly rod. Any tips for me ? Thks in advance for your help rgds walter

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      Albert

      Aug 2, 2019

      Hi Walter,

      When will you be visiting?

      The main summer Tarpon season runs May-July, and most of the migratory Tarpon will be leaving over the next few weeks. However, there are always some “hold-over” Tarpon wintering in the area.

      If you’re set on fishing from the beach, you may want to head over to Sanibel – spots like Lighthouse Beach and Knapp’s Point normally produce good fish.

      However, you’ll have a tough time catching Tarpon from shore. The fish are big, spooky, and a challenge to hook at the best of times, so getting close before you make a cast is key.

      On top of that, It’s illegal to remove large Tarpon from the water, so de-hooking a big one can be difficult and dangerous without a boat.

      If you need more information, we’ve got pages on Tarpon fishing in Fort Myers and Sanibel, although they’re more focused on fishing from a boat.

      I hope that helps!

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      Walter

      Aug 2, 2019

      Hi Albert. Thks very much for you support. We will arrive on the 15 th of aug. And leaving 2 weeks later. Of course we will not remove tarpons . So i have already experience to de hook big tarpons from my several trips to tobago. What you mean ” to have pages….” ( sorry for my bad english… Rgds walter

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      Albert

      Aug 5, 2019

      Hi Walter,

      Always happy to help!

      By “pages” I meant that we have guides to fishing in the area, which I linked in my previous comment in case you wanted some more information.

      I’m sure that you’ll have a great time if you have experience handling big Tarpon while wading. The Fort Myers/Cape Coral area is about the best place to catch them in the state!

      Tight lines!

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  • Aura Shafer

    Aug 3, 2019

    I am wanting to learn to fish and looking to see if there are classes for beginners. I live in the area and have tried to go out on my own but with no success. Is there a group i can join or suggestion you can alert?

    Newbie looking to fish!

    Thank you

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      Sean

      Aug 5, 2019

      Hi Aura,

      Thanks for reading.

      The best way to get started is to go out with an experienced fishing guide. Luckily, there’s no shortage of expert captains in the Tampa Bay area.

      Another thing you can do is join a local fishing club.

      I would also recommend reading some of our other blog posts for beginners. This article will have a bunch of useful information for a first time angler.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Have a good one!

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