Grouper (Broomtail) Fishing (Mycteroperca xenarcha)

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Grouper (Broomtail) Fishing (Mycteroperca xenarcha)

Broomtail Groupers are the Pacific counterparts of the most popularly caught bottom-dwelling fish of the Gulf.

With their broom-shaped tail being the key discerning feature, their patterning closely resembles those of other species of Grouper, especially Gag and Black Grouper.

How big

This is the largest Grouper of the eastern Pacific Ocean, with catches averaging between 30 and 60lbs.


The species is widespread from Southern California to Peru. It's most common throughout the Mexican Pacific waters, however, the population has been in decline due to fishing pressures.

At this time, Broomtail Groupers are very rare, but still not classified as endangered. Possession of these fish is prohibited in California though, even if caught in Mexican waters.

How to catch

They are found over reefs and rocky bottoms in depths up to 200ft, with appearances in shallow estuarine environments as well.

Any smaller dead fish will work for bait, as will squid, cuttlefish, octopus, shrimp, crabs and saltwater crayfish. Like other Groupers, they must be turned quickly or they will hole up and your line will most likely be cut on the bottom structure.

Good to eat?

Similarly to other Groupers, their flesh is mild-tasting and lean.

Similar Game Fish: