Charter Operator
Oceansouldiers

Member since November 2016 Suva, Fiji
Background
Captain Chad's professional experience as a bluewater and topwater guide spans over a decade. He was fortunate to work as head guide for highly regarded exploration charter company Nomad Sportfishing, as well as No Boundaries Oman. He is no stranger to fishing unchartered waters and has experience of both the positives and the risks involved in navigating the unknown. His experiences and passion have placed him at the forefront of catch and release fishing for the infamous Giant Trevally. For over a decade the knowledge he has gained and shared has been a great influence when it comes to promoting this great sport, as well as the catch and release movement. Capt. Chad considers himself lucky enough to fish with some of the greatest pioneers in topwater history, and can't wait to continue fishing and discovering the furthest corners of the planet.

Hey, we're Oceansouldiers

Suva, Fiji
Background
Captain Chad's professional experience as a bluewater and topwater guide spans over a decade. He was fortunate to work as head guide for highly regarded exploration charter company Nomad Sportfishing, as well as No Boundaries Oman. He is no stranger to fishing unchartered waters and has experience of both the positives and the risks involved in navigating the unknown. His experiences and passion have placed him at the forefront of catch and release fishing for the infamous Giant Trevally. For over a decade the knowledge he has gained and shared has been a great influence when it comes to promoting this great sport, as well as the catch and release movement. Capt. Chad considers himself lucky enough to fish with some of the greatest pioneers in topwater history, and can't wait to continue fishing and discovering the furthest corners of the planet.

My Charter Listing

Ocean Souldiers

Suva
trips from $850

Fishing Reports

First Trip to Potential Campsite
First Trip to Potential Campsite
Aug 10, 2014 Suva
Grab a ice cold beer, kick your feet up and enjoy this account of a place we all dream about! Fiji | South Pacific | Feb 2016 After eight months of planning, the dawn was upon me to set out on my adventure to Fiji, in the South Pacific - a place I have always wanted to explore. And what an adventure it was. Flying into Nadi was nothing less than a warm welcome from three locals playing on their Ukulele guitars singing local Fijian songs and greeting everyone with a smile and 'BULA' - 'Welcome' in Fijian. My first port of call was the coral coast - a place called The Beach House. This is a place where palm trees meet the Pacific ocean, with crystal clear waters in the mid 20ºC. Already I could see the fish life was abundant. Now it's quite interesting: where the fresh water meets the ocean it kills all the coral, causing what the Fijians call a "passage" leading out to the open ocean. These passages line the whole of Fiji's main land, causing a pretty amazing ecosystem. The fish are concentrated pretty thick in these areas. Now my plan was to get to the remotest part of this neck of the woods. I hooked up with a couple locals and managed to find the ideal spot. It was just on the edge of the Lau group, a place that is untouched like no other. I managed to charter a plane from the capital Suva. It was an hour flight North East. Flying over the islands really gives you a good perspective of how the reef system works and how pristine this part of the world really is. With a massive grin on my face, we slowly made our descent on an island called Yathata. Getting closer to the reef, I memorised certain areas that I thought would be a good spot to throw some poppers and stick baits. Once again, it was nothing short of a warm welcome. The Fijians are very traditional people - when I arrived, we had a welcoming ceremony known as a Sevu Sevu, where we drank a local non-alcoholic brew called Cava and I was welcomed into the village. My first experience of fishing is this area was later that afternoon, when I went out with the locals to catch some dinner, netting some small fish in the shallows. Basically, the fellas just cruise through the flats and look for the schooling bait fish. Once spotted, they set up their nets on the beach and start their attack, slowly poling themselves out, then circling these fish and netting them. But before we had our chance to catch, a pack of GTs pulled in and the bait fish went flying in all directions as these gangsters of the flats had their fair share. I was frothing - just to see this on my first outing was awesome!!! So the boys managed to bag about 500 fish in their nets - it sounds like a lot, but when there are 120 people in the village to feed every day its just enough. Heading back to the village, I knew this was going to be a week to remember. We planned to have three full days solid fishing, and with the dawn upon us I was so excited I couldn’t contain myself. After seeing yesterday's action, I knew I was in for a treat, but to the extent I’m about to tell you, I could never have fathomed!! So heading out one of three 'Passages' that lead you into the open ocean, I could already see bait getting busted up by critters down below. Now Fiji has quite a remarkable underwater structure: it's all volcanic so the islands are caused from volcanoes that come up from thousands of meters.The clarity of the water is breathtaking and hard to explain - I don’t think Dulux Paints could even make this colour!  So as we made our way around the island, I think it was my 3rd cast in and I had a pack attack of GT's on my Surface lure and for the next half an hour it was mayhem with another 6 GT's boated all in the mid 20Kg range. This ledge became know as SANGA ledge - that's Fijian for GT. It was a first for the islanders to see fish being caught on rod and reel - they are all about the handlines and pulling diving minnows, so they were just excited as I was seeing the fish coming up and smashing the lures. As we carried on further round the island, uncle Eddy, my host, skipper, guide and friend, told me about this next point where they'd been catching Dog Tooth Tuna on live bait. This made me pretty excited cause I know all about these fish and how hardcore they really are!! So it was down with Jig, with no sounder I was guessing we were fishing in about 80-90m of water, and after a hard slog I managed to boat a nice 20-25kg Doggie, got spooled by a few monsters. So uncle Eddy suggested we take a break, with no food on the boat it was no sweat, we pulled up on the South Eastern edge of the island. Eddy suggested coconut crabs, and I was like "hmm yes sounds good, I have heard about these crabs and have always wanted to try them". It wasn’t more than 10 min and the other 2 boys returned from the jungle with 4 monster sized crabs. So it was coconut juice to quench the thirst and crabs to satisfy the belly. What a feast it was!