Fishing in Cabo San Lucas: All You Need to Know
Dec 4, 2019 | 13 minute read Comments
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Reading Time: 13 minutes

We’ve heard a thousand stories about fishing in Cabo San Lucas over the years. Perhaps the most accurate of them all is this single, century-old quote:

Nine yellowfin tuna, four over 150 pounds and the others around 100 pounds, in one day, for two anglers fishing within two miles of the shore. Repeat that for three days and you have a fishery unequaled anywhere.” – Zane Grey, Novelist

A Fishing Boat Near Cabo San Lucas

That is how Zane Grey, master storyteller and IGFA Hall of Famer, described the sportfishing potential of Cabo San Lucas, some 100 years ago. The southern tip of Baja California has a longstanding tradition of leaving its visiting anglers breathless, as anyone who has fished here already knows. No matter how experienced you are, these waters will change the way you think about fishing.

Much has changed in the region since the days of Zane’s century-old Yellowfin frenzies. In those days, the only way to reach Baja’s fishing grounds was by setting sail and venturing south aboard your own vessel. Since then, an entire maze of roads, airports, and hotels has transformed Mexico into one of the hottest vacation spots in the world.

beachside hotels in Cabo San Lucas

You’d be hard-pressed to find many similarities between the Mexico of today and what the country looked like in the 1920s. However, we’re pretty sure that Zane Grey would be pleased to know that the sportfishing grounds of Cabo San Lucas have remained virtually unaltered.

Every year, endless schools of anglers flock to Cabo’s welcoming shores. But unlike many other fisheries, these waters don’t seem to be affected by the crowds. Fishing in Cabo is as good as it’s ever been, and we’re about to show you why.

Destined for Fishing

The southern tip of Baja California is world-renowned for its pristine beaches. And thanks to premium scuba diving locations like the El Arco rock formation, Cabo is also the favorite front-page choice for countless travel brochures.

Fishing in Cabo San Lucas

When most people think about fishing in Cabo, the first image that comes to mind is usually a grander Marlin leaping out of the water. And for good reason; the city is home to the highest-paying Marlin tournament in the world. This place has probably seen more Billfish record breaks than any other location on the planet.

Anglers holding a Marlin on a boat in Cabo
This baby will count as half of your daily bag limit

However, just as fishing the Riviera Maya is about much more than just Bonefish and Permit, Cabo has a whole lot more going for it than giant Billfish. Read on to find out exactly what makes Cabo San Lucas one of the most well-rounded fishing destinations in the Pacific.

Fishing Seasons in Cabo San Lucas

Cabo doesn’t really have a slow season. No matter if you’re an inshore angler or an offshore fisher, something’s always waiting on the other side of that line. Take a look at the seasonality for some of the most popular local gamefish here.

Deep Sea Fishing

Offshore fishing in Cabo is one of those things you’ve got to see to believe. With waters rife with just about every big game species you can think of, and new critters coming in each month, “slow season” seems to be a foreign concept in these parts. Let’s see which species you can catch in these deep waters.

Fishing for Striped Marlin

For ages, Cabo San Lucas has carried the title of “The Striped Marlin Capital of the World.” A tall order for sure, but boy does Cabo have the numbers to prove it. According to billfishreport.com, 2018 was an amazing year for Stripes, with a number of local captains tallying more than 50 Striped Marlin releases per day!

Father and a Cabo fishing guide holding a Marlin, with the son smiling next to them

That’s a lot of Marlin. If you’ve never experienced the joy of catching one, all we can say is you’re in for a treat. 

Known for their acrobatics, Striped Marlin are among the most active fish you’ll have on your line. The sight of them jumping out of the water is something you’ll never forget. And if the acrobatics aren’t impressive enough, just keep an eye on these guys. When roused, Striped Marlin will put on a show by lighting up their stripes in brilliant shades of violet!

The peak season for Striped Marlin in Cabo runs from November to March, but you can catch them pretty much throughout the year. When we spoke to Jack Vitek, World Record Coordinator for the IGFA, he picked Cabo as one of the best Marlin fisheries in the world.

Trolling live bait is the method of choice for Striped Marlin. As most (good) guides will tell you, using circle hooks is a must. Circle hooks cause less damage to the fish, increasing its chances of survival post-release.

Striped Marlin in Cabo

Want something a little more hands-on? Try fly fishing! Catching such a powerful fish with just a light rod in hand isn’t something many anglers are willing to try. However, to say that it’s rewarding would be an understatement. Thanks to the sheer number of Stripes in the area, there’s no better place to give this technique a try.

Other Billfish

The offshore waters of Cabo San Lucas are home to many other Billfish. One of the fastest swimmers in the ocean, the Pacific Sailfish (Pez Vela) migrates through the area between January and March. Sails are pretty common in the 80–100 lb range. 

And then there are the big boys. Blue and Black Marlin typically make their appearance between July and October. Mainly keeping to the Pacific side of the peninsula, these guys are frequent visitors to hotspots like the Golden Gate and San Jaime Bank.

Most Blue Marlin in Cabo San Lucas are males between 250 and 350 pounds. Fly fishing for a “grander” Black Marlin (over 1000 pounds) is obviously not feasible, however, you might want to keep an eye open for “rats” –  Black Marlin in the below-200-pound group. Anglers have reported concentrations of these fly eaters around Cabo several times before, so fly enthusiasts – take notice.

Obviously, not everyone is a Billfish enthusiast. Thankfully, Cabo’s got plenty of other fish roaming its waters.

Other Pelagics

Summertime in Cabo is a perfect opportunity to catch a Tuna or a Dorado. Yellowfins average between 8 and 30 pounds, but monsters in excess of 200 pounds aren’t uncommon at all. Heck, anglers come down all the way from San Diego searching for these guys.

As any seasoned deckhand will tell you, schools of diving birds are the tried and true sign that a Yellowfin school is close by.

Mimicking Cancun‘s seasonality, Dorado fishing peaks in July and August. Hungry Mahi often follow baitfish schools right into the shallows, so don’t be too surprised if your inshore trip ends with more than a few of these delicious fish in the bucket. Everyone’s favorite bycatch, Wahoo, patrol the area during the Summer and Autumn months.

Three anglers on a boat, each holding two Dorado fish
Dorado are a popular catch around Cabo

Inshore fishing

And while most traveling anglers will go offshore for their catch, exploiting the fertile inshore waterways is easily just as fun. Moreover, for families with kids, this might be the perfect way to get them into fishing.

Roosterfish

The most coveted inshore catch in these parts is the Pacific Roosterfish, or as the locals call it, Pez Gallo. A member of the Jack family, the Roosterfish is endemic to the tropical waters of the Pacific and can grow in excess of 100 pounds.

Just as Cozumel is world-renowned for its perennial Permit fishery, the waters of Cabo are brimming with Roosters. If Cabo’s guides are to be believed, the local Pez Gallo population is greater than in any other fishery on the planet. Even Costa Rica.

True or not, there’s no denying this fish is extremely fun to catch. Whether you’re using light tackle or catching them on the fly, Roosterfishing is a blast. Although present year-round, the best time to target Roosters is in the summertime. Roosterfish like herding schools of baitfish against the beaches, so this is your best opportunity to catch them. 

an angler holding a Roosterfish he caught near Cabo San Lucas

Sierra Mackerel

Another champion of the shallows, Sierra Mackerel, is a schooling fish best known for the explosive splashes it creates while hunting. The commotion draws the attention of various types of birds, which can serve as natural fishfinders. 

A typical leader is probably not going to last very long next to Sierra’s razor-sharp teeth, so a wire is more than recommended. Another reason for the Mackerel’s massive popularity? It’s often the main ingredient in “ceviche.” This seafood delicacy is best served with a side of sweet potatoes, avocados or plantain, and seasoned with chili pepper and citrus juices. Bon appetit!

an angler holding a Sierra Mackerel on a boat

Jack Crevalle

Jack Crevalle, or Toro (Bull) to the locals, is perhaps one of the most overlooked inshore species. Be that as it may, the Bull is known to put up quite a battle on the fly. December through July is primetime for Jack Crevalle fishing. Toros between 7 and 20 pounds are regular catches, although 30-pounders aren’t uncommon on a good day. 

Much like offshore fishing, there’s no off-season for fishing the shallows around Cabo. These rocky outcroppings of are a great place for targeting the likes of Snapper, Hogfish or Grouper. These guys will claw their way back into their lairs if you let them, so you better keep your guard up. 

Cabo Fishing Grounds

Fishing-wise, Cabo couldn’t have asked for a better position. To the left, you have the bountiful Sea of Cortez, with its warm waters teeming with fish. To the right, you have the Pacific Ocean, a venue for the most spectacular angling you’ll ever see.

Fishing Boats in Cabo San Lucas, heading out to sea at sunrise

Both options boast equally exciting prospects for angling. Although you’re never going to find a line that separates the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific, the disparities between the two fisheries are more than obvious.

Let’s have a rundown of the major hotspots each side has to offer. We’ll cover species and seasonalities for each of these locales so that when the time comes to wet your line, you’ll know exactly where to head.

The Sea of Cortez

The Sea of Cortez is home to one of the most diverse marine ecosystems on the planet. Over 5,000 species of invertebrates and countless schools of alluring baitfish live in these temperate waters. Critters like shrimp, squid, herring, sardines, and mackerel swim here in their millions.

To you, that might not sound like much, but to the local game fish, that’s like a feast in a 5-star restaurant. Close to shore, you’ll find plenty of Roosterfish, Snapper and Amberjack. Just a little further out, things get serious with offshore stars like Wahoo, Dorado, Tuna, Sailfish and Marlin.

smiling anglers holding a Mahi Mahi on a fishing boat

These are the best spots near Cabo to fish in the Sea of Cortez.

Gordo Banks

Appropriately dubbed the “Wahoo Banks,” this has traditionally been one of the most popular fisheries in all of Baja California. Doubling as a terrific snorkeling site, this fishing gem is as close as 5 miles from the coastline. Located to the southeast of Cabo, the Gordo Banks are actually two fishing spots: the Inner and Outer Gordo Banks. 

The former lies within easy reach of local pangas – sturdy (and cheap) open skiffs ranging in size between 20 and 28 feet.

The Outer Gordo Banks (about 10 miles out) are among the most productive spots in the area. Here, you can catch your fill of Dorado, Wahoo, Yellowtail, Jacks, Pargo and Grouper. Big game anglers can expect to catch Tuna, Marlin, and Sailfish. 

Dorado fishing in Cabo: an angler holding a large Dorado (Mahi Mahi) on a fishing boat

Peak migration times usually occur between April and November. However, thanks to the nearby Sierra Madre mountain range, big winds are not that common. This allows good fishing opportunities during the off-season as well.

1150 Bank

For those determined not to leave Cabo without a story to tell, the 1150 Bank is the perfect choice. The bank lies 20 to 25 miles offshore, and sports a winning combination of underwater structures and baitfish, ideal for big game fishing. A great spot for both Marlin and Tuna, the 1150 is regularly frequented by several species of Sharks as well, particularly the Mako.

Santa Maria Canyon

A little closer to home, Santa Maria Canyon lies 9 miles due south of Cabo. The canyon is a common gathering place for Dorado, Tuna, and Billfish. Thanks to its proximity to Cabo San Lucas and San Jose Del Cabo, the Canyon is a great choice for when the seas are rough.

a smiling female angler holding a Mahi Mahi on a fishing boat

Vinorama Canyon

There’s much more to fishing in the Gulf of California than heavy-duty trolling for Billfish. Nowhere is that more apparent than around the Vinorama Canyon. Situated northeast from the Gordo Banks, this canyon does require a longer boat ride. But boy, is this place worth it.

Schools of Yellowtail mark the beginning of the year at Vinorama, with Dorado and Tuna taking over in early spring. What sets this place apart is that you can catch loads of reef fish here as well. Snappers come here throughout the year, so if you’re coming to Vinorama, get your coolers ready.

The Pacific Ocean

Take a right from Cabo, and you’ll quickly find yourself in the middle of the open ocean. Here, the Pacific currents bring the big and powerful of the game fish world. As many as 70 world records were set in these very waters.

The best Cabo San Lucas fishing spots in the Pacific are:

45 Spot and the Cardonal Canyon

Just 6 miles west of the famous El Arco, the 45 Spot lies at the tail of a 600′ ledge of the Cardonal Canyon. The great thing about this spot is the ocean floor plummets to almost 3000 feet, allowing for some truly spectacular big game fishing. 

a fishing boat, trolling near cabo san lucas

San Jaime Bank

If you ever wanted to fish in 3500′-deep waters, this is your chance. Located at the edges of the Tinaje Trough to the northwest of Cabo, San Jaime Bank is an underwater plateau featuring 3 seamounts which rise up to 150 feet. These seamounts lure schooling baitfish, which, in turn, attract great numbers of Tuna and Marlin.

This is Grander (1000+ lb Marlin) territory, so you better bring your A-game if you want to catch these Billfish here. 

Golden Gate Bank

Stationed north of San Jaime on the other end of the Tinaje Trough, Golden Gate Bank is often considered one of the best Striped Marlin hotspots in all of Mexico. Here, the Stripe bite is traditionally red hot during winter and early spring. 

For those of you who’d like to have their cake and eat it too, this is one of the best spots for Yellowfin Tuna fishing. Yellowfins over 100 pounds are common around the bank, and you can catch them from September through December.

Finger Bank

If you’re the type of person that finds the prospect of double-digit billfish action appealing, you might want to check out the Finger Bank. The bank lies 50 miles from the Cabo San Lucas marina, and is a quintessential Marlin fishery. 

To reach it, you’ll need to go past San Jaime and Golden Gate Banks. It’s a long voyage, and one that not a lot of anglers are willing to embark on. However, Finger Bank is precisely where the majority of those 100-Striper-a-day outings happened. Think about it. Yes, you’ll spend a longer time getting out there, but this place will give you 10 days worth of fishing on a single outing!

Fishing Regulations in Cabo

The waters of the Mexican Pacific boast an impressive diversity of both offshore pelagics and bragworthy inshore fish. Before you can wrestle one of these guys, you’re going to need a fishing permit. By law, any non-resident older than 16 needs a valid Mexican Sportfishing License to fish from a vessel.

Roosterfishing inshore, deep dropping for Snapper, or overnight runs for Marlin all fall under the same set of rules put forward by Conapesca.

A view of the marina in downtown Cabo San Lucas
The Marina in Cabo San Lucas

If you’re booking a fishing charter rather than operating the boat yourself, there’s a chance that your captain will cover the license for you. The larger vessels are more likely to operate in this way compared to the smaller pangas. Still, to avoid any unpleasant surprises on the day of the trip, you should make sure to ask your guide whether the licenses are covered or not.

In case your license is not included, you can easily purchase one online. The permits cost around $9 per day, $23 per week, $35 for a full month, or $47 for an annual fishing license. Fishing from the shore doesn’t require a license. However, you must keep a safe distance of at least 250 meters (800 feet) from any swimmers. 

As far as other regulations are concerned, you may only have a single rod in the water at a time. For bottom fishing, you may use up to four hooks on a solo vertical line.

Bag Limits

A daily bag limit in Mexico is one fish per person, with a few exceptions. You better get your calculators out for this one. You may keep no more than five specimens of a single species, and only one Billfish. That means that a single Marlin, Sailfish or Swordfish count as half of your daily limit. 

Similarly, you can’t boat more than two Mahi, Roosterfish, Tarpon or Shad, which also amount to half of the daily limit.

smiling anglers with their catch on a fishing boat near Cabo San Lucas

In other words, although you may land up to 10 fish in a single day, it’s very important to note which fish these are. Theoretically, you max out your limit out by catching a single Marlin and two Dorados. Or just by catching a Sailfish and a Swordfish.

Of course, as long as you practice catch and release, you can have as much fun as you want. In fact, many local captains advocate catch and release fishing, especially for Billfish. Conservation is a big deal around here. It’s actually one of the main reasons why the fishery was able to retain its premier status for so long.

releasing sailfish in cabo
Catch and release fishing is a big deal in Cabo

The Before and After

Cabo San Lucas is one of those places every traveling angler should have on their bucket list. Few fisheries on the planet will let you experience so much, so quickly.

With offshore monsters and inshore fighters aplenty, this place doesn’t make you choose between quality and quantity. Instead, Cabo lets you openly explore its plentiful waterways, no matter when you decide to do so.

By the time you’re done, this fishing town will see you off as a completely different angler. And those bragging stories you’ll have sure won’t hurt, either.

Charter Boat cruising past Los Arcos in Cabo San Lucas

Got questions about fishing in Cabo San Lucas?

Don’t know which rod to bring, where to buy the best inshore lures in Cabo, or wondering about the best time to go after that Grander Marlin? Don’t hesitate to ask! We’re always happy to discuss fishing in Cabo.

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Comments (42)
  • Mike Nicolosi

    Jul 21, 2015

    I was thinking about coming to fish with some clients in the fall. Typically how are the seas offshore. We are interested in trolling for marlin.

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      Dino

      Jul 27, 2015

      Hi Mike,

      Fall marks the peak season for Blue Marlin and Sailfish, with lots of Blacks and Stripers sticking around as well! As you may know, Cabo was hit by a pretty big storm in the fall of last year, so I’m not sure I’d be able to give you an accurate prediction of the upcoming weather conditions just yet. What I can tell you, however, is that the waves are currently averaging about 1.5ft, with wind speeds between 5-10 knots, which is looking like a pretty standard forecast. Hope that helps!

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  • Jeremy

    Apr 2, 2016

    Hola,

    Great blog.
    Very informative.

    Thanks
    Jeremy

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      Xavier

      Apr 3, 2016

      Thank you for reading, Jeremy!

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  • Steffan

    Apr 29, 2016

    Great write up!

    I have a guided surf fishing trip booked for May, but my wife wants to go out with the me and the boy for some inshore fishing maybe 4-6 hours max. Any recommendation of guides that will allow youngins on the boat, my son is only a year and a half?

    Out of curiosity is there any successful surf fishing on the pacific side of lands end?

    -Steffan

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  • Brian Park

    May 27, 2016

    What would be the most economic way to deep sea fish in cabo? I would like to plan out a trip for mid july as i will be in Monterrey for work, a quick plane ride away. I would need to rent rods but i do have my own reels as i deep sea fish off the coast of socal. Just one or two days in cabo then back home!

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      Cat

      May 27, 2016

      Hi Brian, I’d recommend taking a look at Viviana II for a nice sport fishing boat with trips around the $500 mark, or for a cheaper option, Sushi Time run half day trips around $200. These prices are for the whole boat including gear so if you can find some people to split the trip with the price would go down considerably!
      Hope you have a great trip!

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  • Cameron

    Jul 18, 2016

    I’m coming down in about two weeks. I fish almost every day in Southern California from both the rocks in my area and my skiff. I want to do a lot of surf fishing and ponga fishing. Any recommendations? I’m hoping to get some rooster fish from shore on the popper and maybe some mahi.

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      Cat

      Jul 22, 2016

      Hi Cameron, thanks for your comment. There are a few options for pangas in Cabo, including the ‘Super Panga’ by the Charly Fleet. Take a look here. We’d recommend going out with a guide at the beginning of the trip and then using their local knowledge to get the best up-to-date tips for shore fishing. We hope you have a great time!

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  • Conor

    Aug 11, 2016

    Hi – am thinking of a trip in October for billfish. Would you recommend Gordo banks or San Jaime / golden gate and how far of a run is it to both from the Cabo marina? Thanks!!

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      Cat

      Aug 12, 2016

      Hi Conor,

      Well, the Gordo Banks are pretty hard to beat in terms of sport fishing in the area. They are about 22 miles northeast of the marina in Cabo, and are probably one of the most reliable spots in the area. That’s not to say the San Jaime and Golden Gate Banks aren’t worth fishing too – there’s fantastic fishing here for Blue and Striped Marlin, as well as a host of other species. Also, it’s only 15 miles north of the marina.

      If you happen to be interested in chartering a boat, why not take a look at what is on offer here?

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  • Randy

    Dec 2, 2016

    I am going dec 12 th thru 22nd and am looking for other solo anglers to share several trips with. Anybody else interested?
    Randy

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  • Andre green

    Feb 16, 2017

    I’m headed to Cabo San Lucas mid-Late March and I was wondering what kind of tackle I should bring for the surf.

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      Cat

      Feb 20, 2017

      Hi Andre,

      We’d recommend a 7-9 ft medium weight rod with a spinning reel. 30# line is best to tackle Cabo’s monsters. When it comes to lures, you should do well with a variety of metal lures and crankbaits, with surface poppers also getting some good action. Make sure to bring some wire leader – there are plenty of toothy fish out there!

      Have a great time!

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  • Jose n

    Mar 15, 2017

    Hi, I’m going there on may just for 3 days, I would like some tips for surf fly fishing, any hint??
    Thanks!

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  • Ray

    May 14, 2017

    Hello:
    Questions regarding bringing bait from the US into Cabo. I would like to bring in frozen squid and frozen sardines– can I anticipate any problems?

    Ray

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      Cat

      May 15, 2017

      Hi Ray,

      While it is not possible to bring most meats to Mexico, from what I can find it seems like seafood should be allowed through without a problem. I would strongly recommend you consult your airline first, just to be on the safe side.

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  • Mike Danyko

    Jun 8, 2017

    Ray, I’ll be visiting a resort very close to San Jose del Cabo and the marina there in early August. I am interested in doing some shore/surf fishing during my visit. I have not been able to find a store near by which rents shore/surf fishing pole for the week. Can you advise if you know of a store which rents fishing tackle. Any info will be helpful for trip planning.

    Thanks

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  • loscabosag

    Jul 8, 2017

    Thankyou for sharing…Los Cabos is a wonderful place to live for retirees or those looking for a better quality of life. It’s also an area that makes sense financially to invest in, one must visit..!
    Thankyou.

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  • Mick Farmer

    Jul 10, 2017

    I am coming down to Cabo the last week of August 2017. My target fish is Black Marlin. Which ocean would be the best bet? The Sea of Cortez or the Pacific side? Also, which fishing spot would give me my best chance? Deep water canyons or shallow reefs?
    Regards,
    Mick

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      Cat

      Jul 11, 2017

      Hi Mick,

      Great choice of time of year! Both the Sea of Cortez and the Pacific have some excellent Marlin fishing spots, although you will usually find that the Pacific side wins in numbers of Marlin catches. You’ll want to be focusing on the deep banks and ledges. Try the famous Fingerbank if you have time for a long run offshore – it’s 50 miles out, so you’ll want to take a longer trip. The quality and quantity of fish are worth it, as you find it has less fishing pressure than the famous spots closer to shore.

      Hope that helps and that you have an amazing trip!

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  • Andrew

    Aug 15, 2017

    Hi, Looking to do some shore fishing in front of Playa Grande in a few weeks. What kind of lures do you recommend for dorado? What color lure and weight works best? Also, does shore fishing require a fishing license? Thanks!

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      Lisa

      Aug 29, 2017

      Hi Andrew,

      Most Dorado are caught with trolling lures, like those used to target Billfish. If Dorado are hungry, they will eat pretty much anything, especially if it’s colorful and attention-grabbing. You could have luck with a wide variety of lures, for example rubber skirts, poppers or plugs. The weight is usually up to 1 oz, but some anglers prefer to throw lures 50% heavier than the rating. Just be careful with heavier lures, since Mahi-Mahi are wild jumpers!

      You will need to carry a valid Costa Rica fishing license, which you can easily purchase online. Make sure you have it before you make your first cast!

      Hope that helps,

      Lisa

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  • Richard Field

    Aug 20, 2017

    It’s been eight years since my last trip to Cabo. I fished with a panga fisherman by the name of Carlos, lost his phone number. Silly question but was a great guy. Will be there in early January and want to go two or three days

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      Lisa

      Aug 29, 2017

      Hi Richard,

      January is a great time of year to be fishing in Cabo. You can test your angling skills and battle with schools of Striped Marlin offshore or just test the waters close to shore for Roosterfish. Or perhaps even add Yellowfin Tuna to your list of potential catches offshore!

      You can take a look at charters in Cabo by clicking this link here: goo.gl/nc5Vpw. If you want some help with choosing a charter, you can contact our customer service at +1-888-395-2564 (USA) or +1-850-502-4257 (International).

      Hope that helps!

      Lisa

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  • Douglas

    Oct 20, 2017

    I’m planning a trip to Cabo March 2018 with my wife. I’m interested to see if anyone would want to split an offshore trip to conserve cost.
    Email: [email protected]

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  • Gwyn Mannery

    Dec 5, 2017

    We were reading up on the regulations with the san diego mexican fishing liscense folks and there was an article about a newly required fishing VISA. Does anyone know about this? Would we need one to surf cast/fly fish from shore? Gwyn

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      Cat

      Dec 6, 2017

      Hi Gwyn,

      The visa regulation (FMM Tourist Permit) only applies to people fishing/traveling by boat offshore in Mexican waters, so you should be fine to fish from shore with your regular tourist documents.

      Have a great time! Cat

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  • Ann

    Apr 28, 2018

    Planning a trip to Cabo May 16-18 2018 with my husband and checking to see if anyone wants to split an all day inclusive offshore charter to save on cost. Email: [email protected]

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      George

      Apr 30, 2018

      Hi Ann,

      Thanks for your comment, and we’re glad to hear you’re planning a fishing trip in Cabo! You can find shared charters in Cabo on this page. If you need any help choosing, feel free to reach out to our Customer Service team by calling +1-888-395-2564 (from the US).

      Thank you,
      George

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  • jaswant lal

    Jul 2, 2018

    Is it legal to use casting nets in Los Cabos to catch mullet, sardines mackerel on the shoreline?

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      Stefan

      Aug 10, 2018

      Hi, Jaswant, thanks for reading the blog.

      Unfortunately, I don’t have a definitive answer to that.

      I have found on several places online that casting nets are prohibited and I also haven’t seen any angler who actually does it.

      I would say that you should try fishing with long rods, and not with nets, just in case.

      If I find out something new, I will post it here.

      Tight lines,
      Stefan

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  • Chad Thomas

    Aug 20, 2018

    I’m heading to Cabo in early October. I really enjoy Yellowfin fishing. Does the Cabo side or Sea of Cortez offer better tuna fishing? Also I am looking for a boat that know how to Target Tuna. Can you refer someone my way so I can book now.

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      Stefan

      Aug 29, 2018

      Hi, Chad.

      Thanks for reading the blog.

      I gotta say, you chose the best month to visit Cabo. Yellowfin fishing in October is on fire!

      As for ‘Cabo vs Sea of Cortez’ – it’s a tough call. I’d say both, but if you have to choose, then first fish the Pacific side of Cabo, especially Golden Gate Bank. In case of choppy seas, Sea of Cortez is better. It’s sheltered and equally productive.

      I’d suggest you book a trip with Capt. Olter Schcolnick of Ursula’s Sportfishing Fleet.

      In case you’d like to see some other options, here are some other fishing charters which target Tuna in Cabo.

      Hope this helps.
      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Tight lines,
      Stefan

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  • Federico

    Aug 26, 2018

    Hi,

    Very nice and useful blog!
    I’m planning a couple weeks trip to Cabo San Lucas for the next early-mid April in order to hunt (anyway catch and release) the beautiful shortfin mako, hopefully a big female breeder!
    Is that time of the year right for that purpose? Are there better “season choices”?
    I’m also interested in the bareboat service (not before at least a couple of trip with a local skipper, maybe Sushi Time charter fit for that).
    Do I need a boat license for the bareboat trip, or is not necessary? Any other advice will be greatly appreciated…
    Thanks in advance for the kind attention and response!

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      Stefan

      Aug 29, 2018

      Hi, Federico.

      Thank you for reading the blog and for the feedback. Much appreciated!

      You can catch Shortfin Mako from December through April in Cabo. They are pretty consistent throughout the season.

      What I recommend is to reach out to captains and ask them. You can do that through the ‘Contact Captain’ button. You will find it next to the captain’s name. Once a charter page loads, just scroll down and you will see a blue button. Captains will know what would be the best time to fish for Mako, as they have firsthand experience.

      As for the bareboat service: as you’ve said yourself, it’s good to first fish with a local skipper, so that you get a good idea what the water/fish/boat are. Bare boat in Cabo means that the price includes the crew, fishing tackle, and dock fees. You would need to take care of the bait yourself. Of course, just to be sure before the trip, I suggest asking the captain what exactly is included.

      When it comes to fishing licenses, you do need to purchase a fishing license. Some charters provide a fishing license, while other charters can sell you the fishing license onboard. Last time I checked the license was about $18 per person. For example, Sushi Time sell the fishing license, they are not included in the price.

      A general piece of advice: Cabo is a great fishing spot. There are many other fish species you can target, Striped Marlin, Wahoo, and Yellowfin Tuna in particular. This guide on fishing in Cabo has a lot of info which you can use when planning your trip. I suggest starting there.

      Hope this helps.
      Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Tight lines,
      Stefan

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  • George

    Oct 27, 2018

    Curious to hear if a guy can rent a Panga or center console without a skipper or crew? I’ve fished Cabo 25-30 trips over the years and want to ‘do my own thing’.

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      Sean

      Nov 7, 2018

      Hello George,

      Thanks for reading the blog.

      I’m afraid that our Captains don’t normally offer these kinds of trips. You are welcome to check if any of them would be able to arrange this, though. In this case, I would recommend contacting a few of our charter operators through their listing pages.

      Simply select the boat you like and click on Contact Captain in the lower part of their page. You should be receiving your reply within a day or two.

      Please feel free to let me know should you need any further assistance.

      Tight lines!

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  • Robert

    May 24, 2019

    I’m heading down to Cabo in the fall, I was wondering where off the beach I can catch some nice fish. My main target is roosters but anything is nice. What should I use lure wise and where should I fish?

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      Albert

      May 24, 2019

      Hi Robert,

      Honestly, fish the surf on pretty much any beach around Cabo and you can come across some big Roosters and Sierra Mackerel.

      The only thing to be aware of is that, by law, you can’t fish within 250 meters (820 feet) of swimmers or beach-goers. Because of that, it’s worth traveling a little out of town so you don’t have to pack up every time a family walks onto the beach.

      The lures we’ve recommended in the past are a mixture of metal lures, crankbaits, and surface poppers – your best bet is to try a couple of different things and see what’s working, based on the conditions on the day.

      Hope this helps!

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  • Brent Ramsay

    Sep 2, 2019

    La Paz or Cabo best place to take a charter for yellowfin? How about inshore fishing?

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      Sean

      Sep 2, 2019

      Hi Brent,

      Thanks for reading.

      For Yellowfin, Cabo is a better option. These guys are on the bite from September through December.

      Inshore fishing, on the other hand, is better in the La Paz area.

      Calmer seas aside, you’ll have decent numbers of Roosterfish and Jack Crevalle to catch here. Look for them from May through July.

      I hope you’ll find this helpful.

      Tight lines!

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