Newfoundland

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Fishing in Newfoundland

Newfoundland’s infinite fishing potential put this island on the radar of both novice and seasoned anglers. This is a very popular, though remote destination, so coming to Newfoundland will require some preparation. Rest assured it will be well worth it!
 
Locals take great pride in their fisheries, both because they’re diverse and because there are fish biting all year. Anglers from all over the country come here to fish for Atlantic Salmon, as well as its cousin landlocked Salmon, also known as “Ouananiche.” Trout fishing is very popular during summer, but excellent Cod fishing is what mostly attracts fishermen to the island.
 
If you’re coming to Newfoundland to go after a mixed bag of fish, Atlantic Mackerel, Arctic Char, Northern Pike, and Whitefish are on the menu. You can also go after Lobster and Crab in late spring, which guarantees a seafood feast at the end of the day.
 
Newfoundland fishing charters base their trips on the seasonality of local species. Trips usually last 2–4 hours, but you can do a lot in that time. The weather can be fickle here, so guides organize their offer in a way that will be both fun and safe for you.
 
The island is not only big, but also full of hidden rivers and coves, perfect for fishing in pristine nature. If you’re looking for a local expert to take you out, Canso, Isle aux Morts, and Cox's Cove are some of the best spots to start.

Rules & Regulations

While locals don’t need a fishing license to cast a line, Newfoundland has very specific fishing regulations for non-residents, depending on where and how long they plan to fish. Visitors are officially required to have a fishing guide if you want to fish more than 2,600 feet (800 meters) from a highway. Sometimes charters provide all the necessary permits, but the best way to be sure is to check with your captain before the trip.

Newfoundland Fishing Seasons

January

It’s cold in Newfoundland in January, but you can still find a decent bite if you know where to look. Arctic Char is biting up north, as well as Atlantic Mackerel and Squid.

February
Even though the weather is still far from optimal, February usually marks the beginning of the fishing season for inland Trout. These beautiful fish are always fun to catch, but again, location is crucial.
 
March

It’s slowly becoming warmer outside, and there are more and more promising fishing days. Head out to catch your fill of Atlantic Mackerel, or if you’d rather fish rivers and streams, Brook Trout is the way to go.

April
You can target inland Trout until the season closes mid-month. After that, Whitefish, Northern Pike, Char, Capelin, and Mackerel are all there for the taking.
 
May
In May you’ll see more and more anglers on the water as the fishing is getting hot. Lobster season is officially open, and you can also go crabbing. Inland Trout fishing is open once again, so opportunities for fishing fun abound.
 
June

This is one of the most exciting months for fishing in Newfoundland. Salmon season is finally open. On your way from a productive Salmon hunt, pick up the Lobster pots you set up earlier and get ready for a royal meal.

July
The Cod fishing that made Newfoundland famous is opening in July and it will be possible to go after these delicious bottom dwellers on select days during the next couple of months. Talk to your captain to find the best time to go fishing for Cod.
August

Make the most of the summer weather and head out to target a wide array of species. Salmon, Cod, Mackerel, Trout – just about anything is active and biting in August. What’s more, there are some really big fish out there for you.

September

Both Trout and Salmon fishing usually close by the end of the first week of September. You can sometimes enjoy the last of the Cod fishing towards the end of the month, so make your efforts count.

October

Most local charters are running trips until the end of October, after which they put away their gear for the year. However, you can still find local guides to take you out for some Mackerel and Char fishing.

November

The ocean is becoming unpredictable and it’s getting quite chilly on land as well. If you don’t mind winter chills that much, you can always go north and target Arctic Char, which can get big this time of year.

December

There’s no messing around in December – low temperatures can be unpleasant for anglers. Fishermen who don’t let the cold get them down should bundle up and fish for Atlantic Mackerel and Arctic Char.

Newfoundland Fishing Calendar

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Top Targeted Species in Newfoundland