Clam (Spisula solidissima)

Clam

  • Food Value Excellent
  • Game Qualities None
  • Habitats Flats, Inshore

“Clam” is the general name for countless different species of mollusc. They’re a traditional part of many countries’ cuisines. As well as being popular at the dinner table, Clams are a go-to bait for many different fish species, from Redfish and Flounder to Stripers and Seabass. 

 
Clams may be small, but they live a surprisingly long time. Even the ones in your local fish market could be over 30 years old. Some species are known to live for centuries! 

When & Where?

Clamming is a popular pastime all along the East Coast, usually harvesting Atlantic Surf Clams. They’re not just in the US, though. Clams are an important harvest all over the world, from Italy to India and beyond. Clam season is at its best in the summer. Head down to the beach at low tide and get some!
A box full of Clams after a day at the beach

How to Harvest Clams

Clams are usually harvested by digging in muddy tidal waters. This can be a fun way to pass the day if you don’t mind getting dirty – kids love it. All you really need it a shovel and a bucket, but serious Clamdiggers (or Clammers, as they’re sometimes called) also use waders and specialist tongs, hoes, or nets to make things easier.

Taste Good?

Absolutely! From Clam chowder to spaghetti alle vongole, these delicious shellfish make for one of the tastiest sauces out there. And the best thing is that if you don’t like them, there are plenty of fish out there that do!
 

Fish Species Similar to Clam

Crab

Lobster

Scallop


Top Clam Fishing Charters