100% Weather Protection

Cancelled due to bad weather?
We'll help reschedule or refund.

Instant Confirmation

No more back and forth.
Secure your booking in just one step.

Best Price Guarantee

Found the same trip for less?
We'll refund the difference!

Top Fishing Charters in Oregon Coast

Fishing in Oregon Coast

Fishing on the Oregon Coast is all about diversity. In fact, you can experience some of the greatest variety in the Pacific Northwest while fishing here, including the region’s most sought-after game fish. Chinook Salmon are king in these waters and tend to keep anglers busy most of the year. Steelhead Trout, Sturgeon, Albacore Tuna, Lingcod, and Dungeness Crab also top the charts, depending on where you set sail.

With your choice of lakes, rivers, the Pacific Ocean, and more than a dozen bays, there’s no end to the possibilities. This coast may have marked the end of Lewis and Clark’s journey, but it’s just the beginning for any adventurous angler. Oregon Coast fishing charters are your ticket to all of these waters and the prizes that come with them!

Top Oregon Coast Fishing Spots

With more than 350 miles of coastline, the Oregon coast will have you spoiled for choice. U.S. Highway 101 runs up and down this magnificent seaside, offering access to freshwater and saltwater fisheries every step of the way. Whether you’re one for light tackle Bass fishing or an overnight Tuna run offshore, there’s no shortage of possibilities here. Simply choosing where to fish can be the hardest part, which is why we’ve narrowed it down to some of the hottest fishing spots from north to south.

Astoria and the Columbia River

At the top of our list is Astoria, a location which offers access to some of the best saltwater and freshwater fishing around. It was here that the Lewis and Clark Expedition finally came to an end, where the Columbia River meets the Pacific Ocean.

Charters out of Astoria give you access to the ocean as well as several productive bays, including Youngs Bay, Nehalem Bay, and Tillamook Bay. These waters produce a steady supply of ocean Salmon from spring through fall. Meanwhile, Dungeness Crab and bottom fish like Lingcod, Kelp Greenling, and Cabezon provide excellent fishing through winter and most other months. Halibut season opens in May and stays open through September or until the annual quota is met. For a taste of the deep sea fishing Oregon’s coast has to offer, try heading offshore between July and September when Albacore Tuna are in season.

The Columbia River provides equally stellar opportunities, including trophy Sturgeon (May through July) and some of the best Chinook fishing in the world. Spring Chinook enter the river in March, followed by the summer run--also known as “June Hog” season--and Astoria’s infamous Buoy 10 fishery in August. Coho Salmon and Steelhead weave their way into the crowd during late summer months, adding to the excitement of this world renowned fishery. In winter, you can fish smaller rivers in the area for Steelhead and Sturgeon, as well.

Nehalem and Tillamook Bays

Next on our list is a pair of bays just over 40 miles south of Astoria. Nehalem Bay is the smaller of the two, but well worth a pit stop on your way down the coast. This spot is especially popular for Crabbing and sees excellent Chinook fishing from July through September. One special perk at Nehalem Bay is the local Elk population. Herds often wander to the shoreline and young calves playfully chase harbor seals into the water.

Tillamook Bay may not feature regular Elk sightings, but it does boast an incredibly diverse fishery. Fed by 5 different tributaries, this ecosystem sees a unique blend of freshwater and saltwater throughout the seasons. The biggest draw in Tillamook Bay is the fall Chinook in these waters from September to late November, when anglers catch a few 50-60 lb specimens every year. Around the same of year, deep sea charter boats head offshore in search of Tuna.

Tillamook Bay’s tidal flats offer excellent clamming, while casting lines from the jetties produces Greenling and Seabass. In winter, the crabbing here is excellent, but heavy rainfall drives these delicacies away. The same rainfall causes Sturgeon to flock to the bay, giving anglers plenty of reason to stick around. Those who are intent on Crabbing head a few miles east to Netarts Bay instead.

Nestucca Bay

Nestucca Bay sits about 30 miles south of Tillamook. The bay itself offers no access to the ocean, but it sees excellent spring and fall Chinook fishing. Crabbing opportunities are very limited here, but the area makes up for it with its own unique twist on deep sea fishing. Just head to Pacific City on the oceanside of the upper bay and check out Oregon’s beach dory fleet. Anglers launch these shallow-draft boats straight into the surf to catch Rockfish, halibut, Salmon, and even Albacore.

Yaquina Bay

Next up is Yaquina Bay, one of Oregon’s premier coastal estuaries. Here you’ll find plenty of fishing for sea Salmon, Crabbing and jetty angling. Surfperch and Herring spawn between February and May, giving you plenty of reason to cast a few lines from shore while you wait for fair weather. The bay flats are rife with Clams and Shrimp to use as bait while fishing for Perch or Steelhead in the local streams. In winter and spring, the Sturgeon fishing is strong upriver near Toledo.

Coos Bay

Continuing south, Coos Bay offers another yet another chance to explore the Oregon coast fishing scene. This large, calm bay serves as both a seaport and a stellar fishery, featuring the likes of Surfperch, Sturgeon, and Striped Bass. Crabbing is almost always good when you fish out of Charleston at the bay’s entrance. The north and south shorelines outside the entrance offer unique surf fishing opportunities for Stripers. Charters in the area surrounding Coos Bay have access to offshore bottom fishing and the Albacore Tuna run.

And Much More…

Fishing on the coast of Oregon goes far beyond all of the above, including more bays as well as numerous streams and lakes. The Nehalem, Nestucca, Umpqua, Siuslaw, Siletz, and Alsea rivers are just a few coastal streams that offer Sturgeon, Steelhead, Cutthroat Trout, Walleye, and various Salmon runs. Many lakes on the west side of the Coast Mountains host Largemouth Bass, with exceptionally good fishing in Tenmile Lake.

Oregon Coast Fishing Types

Surf Fishing

Fishing from jetties and rocky shorelines in Oregon’s coastal bays will bring you Surfperch, Greenling, and other bottom fish. The best time to cast your line is the last 2 hours of an incoming tide. Be careful not to cast too far out, since many fish are just a few feet from the rocks. Sand Shrimp, Clam necks, and pieces of Herring work well as bait.

Fly Fishing

Winter and spring offer world class Steelhead fishing in Oregon’s coastal streams, with some of the best fishing between January and April. Fly anglers have a blast targeting this acrobatic and relentless fish, in addition to Salmon, Cutthroat Trout, and Surfperch.

Trolling

Anglers primarily target Salmon by trolling, whether they’re fishing in the rivers, bays, or the ocean. It’s common to troll cut-plug Herring across the bottom while fishing in or near bay entrances, while spinners are better suited for trolling midbay zones. Salmon fishing in the Columbia River takes on many forms, including back trolling and bouncing roe clusters on the bottom.

Trolling is also effective when Tuna fishing. Anglers in Oregon rely on lures such as feathered and rubber-skirted jigs trolled at high speed to catch this fish.

Bottom Fishing

Bottom fishing in the bays and offshore will help you catch Halibut, Lingcod, Cabezon, and other species. Herring, Octopus, and jigs are common bait choices.

Need to Know

Oregon coast fishing charters do not include a fishing license, so be sure to purchase one ahead of time. Anglers age 12 and above are required to carry a fishing license for freshwater and saltwater fishing, available online.

Many species in Oregon have size and bag limits, and some are closed to harvest at certain times. When fishing for Steelhead, be aware that many rivers host both wild and hatchery fish. Wild Steelhead are generally catch and release only, but you can keep hatchery Steelhead.

Species like Sturgeon and Halibut are available to harvest during specific seasons, as announced by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. The best way to fish responsibly is to hire a local guide who is familiar with regulations.

Oregon Coast
4.26
Based on 9994 reviews by FishingBooker anglers

Oregon Coast Fishing Seasons

January is a great time to explore the Oregon coast, just be careful to dodge those winter storms! The rivers promise Sturgeon and Steelhead, while the protected bays offer excellent bottom fishing for Lingcod and Rockfish.

No matter where you find yourself on the Oregon coast at this time of year, rest assured there’s something to hook into! Try Crabbing and bottom fishing in the bays or test the coastal rivers for winter Steelhead.

March is a great time to cast a few lines from the jetties for Surfperch, Herring, and large Lingcod. You can still find good Crabbing in Netarts Bay, but not in many other places. Spring Chinook are entering the Columbia River.

April is full of possibilities, including the last of the winter Steelhead and the first of the Spring Chinook. Many locals are digging around the beaches and bay flats for Clams. Bottom fishing near shore is top notch.

Halibut season is open, offering some of the best bottom fishing Oregon has to offer. Lingcod and other deep dwellers are biting vigorously, too. Surf fishing off the rocks and clamming on the beaches will keep you busy on shore.

June is an excellent time to hit the Columbia River for big Chinook Salmon and “dinosaur” Sturgeon weighing hundreds of pounds. Halibut will still be open to harvest if the quota wasn’t met already.

When regulations allow, July can be a great time to target Coho Salmon offshore as they head toward the Columbia River. Casting lines off the coast might also bring you Halibut or Albacore Tuna.

The Buoy 10 Fishery in Astoria has many anglers rushing to the Columbia River for fall Chinook, Coho, and Steelhead. At the same time, deep sea fishermen are heading 20-40 miles offshore for Tuna.

The Halibut and ocean Salmon fisheries will be closed in some years, but there’s still plenty to keep you preoccupied in the rivers and bays. Head offshore to catch the last of the Tuna run or get a taste of the region’s Dungeness Crab fishing.

By now, Salmon fishing is largely limited to Oregon’s coastal bays and rivers. If the season is relatively dry, you can expect superb Crabbing at this time of year. Trophy Sturgeon hunters will be following the fish upstream from Astoria.

If the weather and regulations allow, November is a great time to head into the bays for some of the year’s best Crabbing and Rockfishing. On the other hand, there’s lots of Clamming and surf fishing potential on shore.

Winter fishing on the coast of Oregon is all about bottomfish, Steelhead, and Sturgeon. For those willing to brave the weather, excellent Crabbing awaits offshore. 

Oregon Coast Fishing Calendar

Loading Fish Calendar!
Please Wait...

What People Are Saying About Oregon Coast

"Fish'en the Wilson"

FishingBooker Member fished with Rob's Greenwater Guide Service on December 27, 2018

Track the weather. Best fishing for stealhead is after lots of rain that raises rivers to flood stage for several days. Be ready to fish when the water gets to a cloudy emerald green. The Kilchis will be ready first, Usually the second day after the rain backs off. The Wilson and Trask take longer, three days minimum.

"Review of Play N Hookey Charter"

Thomas R. fished with Play N Hooky Guide Service - Tillamook Bay on October 17, 2018

Don't bring any of your own fishing gear. Dress for rain and cold - although it was 81 degrees on 10-17-18 when I went.

"Salmon fishing on the Nehalem"

Mark R. fished with Salmon Fishing Oregon on October 1, 2018

Bring rain gear and something warm to wear -- Oregon coast is amazingly beautiful but chilly and wet!

"Full day "

Christopher P. fished with Reel Em Up Fishing - Tillamook on September 25, 2018

Get Rod at reel em up fishing to take you out

Top Fishing Techniques in Oregon Coast

  1. Bottom Fishing
  2. Deep Sea Fishing

Top Targeted Species in Oregon Coast

Rainbow Trout (Steelhead)

Sturgeon

Salmon

Crab

Top Oregon Coast Destinations